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'87 GL1200 I
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All, thought I would reach out about my latest problem. I have an '87 GL1200 I, and when I was in the process of taking the water pump cover off to change the timing belts, one of the long bolts broke off. I initially had two bolts that would not come loose easily, and I moved them back and forth until one of the short ones came out but the long one broke off inside.
What do I do now? I am going to go ahead and do all the maintenance needed but I need some pointers on getting that broken bolt out of the aluminum case.
Any help is appreciated.

Thanks,
 

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2003 GL1800A
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776 Posts
Pics? How much of the bolt if any is still proud of the surface?
 
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There are only 2 bolts holding the hose connection on the water pump housing, 6x22mm. No need to take the water pump cover off to change the belts but if you can get the other bolts out and pull the cover off there will be enough of the broken bolt exposed to get hold of it.
 

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'87 GL1200 I
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Pics? How much of the bolt if any is still proud of the surface?
Unfortunately there is no bolt threads sticking out, it is a long bolt and it broke off down inside the case area.
There are only 2 bolts holding the hose connection on the water pump housing, 6x22mm. No need to take the water pump cover off to change the belts but if you can get the other bolts out and pull the cover off there will be enough of the broken bolt exposed to get hold of it.
Unfortunately I didn't realize it, and took off all the pump bolts instead. To late now.:confused:
 

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2003 GL1800A
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There are a lot of ways to remove a broken stud - some involve useless stud extractors (I don't recommend those) or left-handed drill bits (I have had some success with those depending on how flat the top of the broken stud is), or using a welder to build up a "blob" of steel on top of the stud that can then be turned directly, or the blob can be used to complete a high-amperage electrical circuit that heats the bolt, breaking the galvanic corrosion once cooled.

Without pics, all I can do is wish you luck, and offer that YouTube is your best friend if you're going to tackle this one yourself.
 

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Been a long time since I’ve been in where you are but is the broken bolt in another piece that can be removed or is it in the engine block,it won’t be easy to get out but just replacing the part it’s broken in might be a option,I’ve removed a lot of broken bolts and in aluminum it a job to drill the center,
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
There are a lot of ways to remove a broken stud - some involve useless stud extractors (I don't recommend those) or left-handed drill bits (I have had some success with those depending on how flat the top of the broken stud is), or using a welder to build up a "blob" of steel on top of the stud that can then be turned directly, or the blob can be used to complete a high-amperage electrical circuit that heats the bolt, breaking the galvanic corrosion once cooled.

Without pics, all I can do is wish you luck, and offer that YouTube is your best friend if you're going to tackle this one yourself.
Thanks for the feed back. I am watching some interesting ways to get a recess broken bolt out of aluminum.
 

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What ever you do, don't think you can freehand drill it out. That way lies madness, both for you and whoever ultimately removes the bolt. As was mentioned if the part is removable, do that, first. Photos will help. EDM is the safest route. Drilling with an alignment jig will work as well. Heat is always your friend in these cases. If the threads are completely corroded, a Heli-Coil will most likely be required.
 

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I had that same problem on my last 1500. Once I removed the bolts I could, and removed water pump, I was able to get what was left of broken bolt out again.

Try a little penetrating oil overnight. Since you say bolt is broken flush, your options may be limited.
gumbyredd
 

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Like was mentioned by Rambozo,drill it out is risky but it isn’t impossible,if you can center punch the near center,start a small drill and assure it’s really close to center,it’s risky [ I was a toolmaker and drilled out many) bolts,then you can increase the size drill until you can get an ezout in it but if it breaks,you can’t get it out,best to take that par off and just replace it.
 

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1983 gl1100
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Hi All, thought I would reach out about my latest problem. I have an '87 GL1200 I, and when I was in the process of taking the water pump cover off to change the timing belts, one of the long bolts broke off. I initially had two bolts that would not come loose easily, and I moved them back and forth until one of the short ones came out but the long one broke off inside.
What do I do now? I am going to go ahead and do all the maintenance needed but I need some pointers on getting that broken bolt out of the aluminum case.
Any help is appreciated.

Thanks,
Like everyone else says. I wouldn't try to freehand drill it. If you know a machinist he should be able to chuck up a bolt of the same size about 1.5" long and drill a centering hole through it, which you could use as a guide to keep the drill bit centered on the broken bolt, but you'll have to go slow and use plenty of cutting oil. Then go progressively bigger on the drill bits to increase the size of the hole. DON'T get so close that you remove threads.

The heat from the drilling coupled with the oil used for drilling may allow the use of a quality easy out, but don't force it. If you break the EasyOut you loose other options.

If you decide to use heat, don't put the torch in the hole, you will most certenly melt the aluminum making it unusable. Get a smaller long bolt, grip the head with vise grips so you don't burn yourself, then heat the smaller bolt to threads to "Red" and hold that bolt end against the broken stud. The heat will transfer, but it may take a few applications.

Then try the Easy Out again.

Good Luck! Alan
 

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2003 GL1800A
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If you know a machinist he should be able to chuck up a bolt of the same size about 1.5" long and drill a centering hole through it, which you could use as a guide to keep the drill bit centered on the broken bolt, but you'll have to go slow and use plenty of cutting oil. Then go progressively bigger on the drill bits to increase the size of the hole. DON'T get so close that you remove threads.
If you use this method, AND a left-handed drill bit (I've had good success with the ones from Harbor Freight), along with copious soakings in PB Blaster or Kroil, you may find this is all you need to get the bolt out. You'll need enough threads to engage the new center-drilled bolt, but if you do this is the method I'd try first.
 

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1983 gl1100
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Short of enough threads to engage the center drilled bolt, of the mounting surface is flat at a 90* angle to the bolt, you can also have the machinist drill a 1" block for the outside diameter of the center drilled bolt to hold the alignment by resting the "Block" on the mating surface and going through it first then into the sheared bolt hole.

Thanks for the "Left Handed Drill Bit" idea. I keep forgetting they make these things! ‹(•¿•)›

Alan
 

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1998 GL1500 Asp and 2017 GL1800 4AC
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Hi All, thought I would reach out about my latest problem. I have an '87 GL1200 I, and when I was in the process of taking the water pump cover off to change the timing belts, one of the long bolts broke off. I initially had two bolts that would not come loose easily, and I moved them back and forth until one of the short ones came out but the long one broke off inside.
What do I do now? I am going to go ahead and do all the maintenance needed but I need some pointers on getting that broken bolt out of the aluminum case.
Any help is appreciated.

Thanks,
Are these the bolts you are talking about? #17 ?
Font Art Auto part Drawing Circle
 

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Hi All, thought I would reach out about my latest problem. I have an '87 GL1200 I, and when I was in the process of taking the water pump cover off to change the timing belts, one of the long bolts broke off. I initially had two bolts that would not come loose easily, and I moved them back and forth until one of the short ones came out but the long one broke off inside.
What do I do now? I am going to go ahead and do all the maintenance needed but I need some pointers on getting that broken bolt out of the aluminum case.
Any help is appreciated.

Thanks,
I’ve had the same problem and if I remember correctly that screw is blocked by a lower frame member. Any way the way I approached the problem was to lower the engine by removing the engine mounts…. No you won’t remove the engine but you’ll need to ‘tweak it’
enough to get a straight line to drill. If there is any of the screw sticking above the surface (hopefully) you can gently file the screw so it’s a flat surface. A flat surface is easier to drill. You’ll want to center punch EACTLYin the center. The first thing to try is an easy-out. If that doesn’t work (don’t break it!!) then you can drill it out till it can be retapped. Make sure your drills are all sharp, start small …. Say 3/16” and get a little larger till you can retap the hole with a 6mm tap. Go slow because you don’t want to break a drill bit in the hole while drilling! I can’t stress this enough!! You don’t want to break a drill bit!
Good luck!
 

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1987 GL1200 Interstate
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In post 2 Tamathumper asked for pics. Sure would be good to see what you're dealing with.

Help us help you.
 

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1998 GL1500 Asp and 2017 GL1800 4AC
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I'm assuming those are the bolts he is talking about. However you replied to my quote, so I'm not sure if the original poster saw your question. Those who have been using this forum longer than I may know. Alan
Really? It sure appears that I replied to the original poster on my screen. Must be a glitch somewhere.

Anyway, assuming is what I try not to do when trying to reply to a poster. It causes too much confusion.
 

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1983 gl1100
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Sometimes Confusion is a "Good Thing".

Well hopefully that is the case (your reply to the original poster that is). I just don't normally get a, "XXX replied to a discussion you are following at ......" in the e-mail when someone posts elsewhere in the forum. The bulk of e-mail would drive me crazy, so hopefully it is a glitch as you say. Alan
 
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