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When I removed the cover, it appears as if the last mechanic that touched this used some sort of sealer at this connection. The O-Ring seemed flat (I suspect he did not use a new one) and the "packing material" was kind of brittle. I could flake off little bits here and there. I doubt it was vaseline since there was nothing "wet". Totally dried. I was able to get the old ring out but the channel was filled with this hard brittle stuff. I was able to scrape most of it away.

The pump side of the connection still appears to have some sort of residue on the mating surface. Any opinions on how to remove it. Someone suggested acetone or nail polish remover. I ordered a new O-Ring to use when I re-attach the water pump cover.

Upon reassembly, any opinions on what to use as a lubricant? Should I also use some sort of sealant?

1983 Goldwing Interstate. I'm the original owner. Many years ago, I had the timing belts changed. That was the last mechanic that touched this bike. I can't believe the factory would have assembled the 2 parts that way.
 

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Clean the surface with sandpaper on a stiff block or something so it stays flat. No lubricant or sealant is needed with a new o-ring.
 

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Drummers trick: You can contact cement a piece of sandpaper to a plate of glass or a new piece of MDF to get a super flat sanding surface. Then move the piece over the paper, instead of the other way around.
 

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Drummers trick: You can contact cement a piece of sandpaper to a plate of glass or a new piece of MDF to get a super flat sanding surface. Then move the piece over the paper, instead of the other way around.

Wow....... We used that technique (glass) about two years ago to resurface heads on a GL1500...! Works great.....!
 

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Drummers trick: You can contact cement a piece of sandpaper to a plate of glass or a new piece of MDF to get a super flat sanding surface. Then move the piece over the paper, instead of the other way around.
What do drummers need to be that flat? Not the cymbals. :ROFL:
 

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The heads on a drum are stretched over a "bearing edge".

A metal rim holds the head against that edge, and the more the rim is tightened down, the higher the pitch of the drum will be. But because there are 6, 8 or more lugs that must be tensioned around the circumference of the drum, each must be tightened the same amount to achieve a consistent tone.

If the bearing surface isn't flat all the way around the drum, you'll have a harder time tuning the head and getting a consistent sound. So a drum "shell" is made, and then each bearing edge is "surfaced" to ensure it's as flat as possible.

https://www.moderndrummer.com/2014/12/need-know-bearing-edges/

Snare drums have a depression in the bottom bearing edge that allows the snare elements to pass over or through the bearing edge and across the thin head on the bottom, but they're designed so that the "dip" is centered between lugs, and the snare elements deaden the "ring" of the bottom head of a snare drum in any event, so the effect on tone is minimized.
 

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The heads on a drum are stretched over a "bearing edge".

A metal rim holds the head against that edge, and the more the rim is tightened down, the higher the pitch of the drum will be. But because there are 6, 8 or more lugs that must be tensioned around the circumference of the drum, each must be tightened the same amount to achieve a consistent tone.

If the bearing surface isn't flat all the way around the drum, you'll have a harder time tuning the head and getting a consistent sound. So a drum "shell" is made, and then each bearing edge is "surfaced" to ensure it's as flat as possible.

https://www.moderndrummer.com/2014/12/need-know-bearing-edges/

Snare drums have a depression in the bottom bearing edge that allows the snare elements to pass over or through the bearing edge and across the thin head on the bottom, but they're designed so that the "dip" is centered between lugs, and the snare elements deaden the "ring" of the bottom head of a snare drum in any event, so the effect on tone is minimized.
I'll be. So it's not just a piece of rubber stretched over a cut off barrel???? :ROFL:
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Here's photos. Acetone did not touch the stuff on the bike side. I think the cover side is clean now. I'd rather use a chemical remover instead of a mechanical remover so as not to "deform" the bike side mating surface. Can anyone recommend a product?
 

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Yeah, they used some sort of sealer. It will probably come off with steel wool.

Fill the hole with paper towels, or something, so unwanted bits don't get into the water pumps realm. Probably should do that if you use the glass & sandpaper method, too.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks a bunch guys. I happened to have a flat sharpening stone and went to work on the deposits on the bike side and the cover piece. I could not get rid of the discoloration but I am satisfied with the smoothness of the surface. Like a baby's azz. Perhaps the discoloration is more like a stain? In any event, I filled the rad and started it up. I prayed the fan would eventually start.....and it did. Buttoned everything up and so far no leaks after a 20 minute idle. This was the first start since putting it away last fall. Smoked like he!! for a while (from putting a Tbsp oil in each cylinder last fall). Road test tomorrow. Again, thanks guys!!
 
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