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Hello - I have what might be a dumb question - I know I have to disconnect the battery and remove it before any welding. Are there any other considerations if I want to use a 110 volt / 90 amp wire feed welder to weld my mufflers and mounting brackets while on the bike?

I just don't want to damage the electrical system.

Thx !!!:baffled:
 

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You are OK to weld on it. Just need to disconnect the battery from the bike and you'll be fine.
 

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Thanks Norton - I appreciate the quick reply !!!
 

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Keep the grounding clamp from the welder as close to the spot you are welding to. You dont want any unnecessary AC current flowing where it doesnt need to. Plus the battery of course. Have fun...

Bill
 

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Buy the way. Got a good insurance policy?

'
(Kiddin)
Nightrider1
 

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Do NOT place the ground clamp on the bike's frame.

Place it on the piece to be welded, on the back side.

Currents running through the muffler, then through part of the frame, and trying to use part of the bike's wiring harness as a ground path....... All of these things spell disaster for your bike's electrical system.

Disconnect the battery just to be safe and ground the positive lead to the frame.

Just an electronic technician's thoughts... stray currents can fry the wiring harness before you can pull that welding rod off the muffler.
 

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I'd also shield the bike as much as possible with a piece of sheet metal to keep crud and spatter off the rest of the bike. Seems like it would be cleaner and do a better job to tack the parts while on the bike and do the finish weld off the bike.
 

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I'd line everything up, tack weld it in place and than remove the exhaust and finish up the job. It will be stronger in the long run. Just my 2 cents
Later Rumple
 

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Rumple wrote:
I'd line everything up, tack weld it in place and than remove the exhaust and finish up the job. It will be stronger in the long run. Just my 2 cents
Later Rumple
I would totaly agree with rumple
 

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I had this discussion with a mechanic and welder and he takes a different view. He's aware of the thoughts on this topic but always leaves the battery in when he's welding on a vehicle.

His view is that the battery acts as a resistor and protects the rest of the electrical/computer system.

I had him weld a couple of tabs on my bike to hold Harley mufflers and had no issues with the battery being in.

Like most things there is more than one view.
 

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Well a lot of people do a lot of things, till one day they get caught. Just like many people when using jumper cables vehicle to vehicle just jump post to post, and get away with it for a long time, till the one day, they do not.

Having been a pipe fitter/plumber for years and having welded everything from pipe to bikes, safety with welding cannot be stressed enough. Sure you can get away with things, most of the time, many do, most do, I have too. But welding a couple little tabs or braces on the bottom of the frame with the ground clamp close to the work, is a bit different than welding a bead around a muffler. And cars are different than bikes, like with a car up on a lift and working under it , with the ground clamp close to the work, it is cool.

One of the big things with a bike is you are close to the battery, and it is the battery fumes that are explosive, so if you are going to weld on a bike, it is just best to take the battery out of the bike , takes only a couple minutes, or at the very least, lay a wet towel or something over it . What you are doing is preventing a spark from igniting the battery fumes. They are quite explosive. .

Also with the battery out, and both positive and negative cables not in contact with the frame, if current does flow though some part , such as a diode, it will not be enough to harm it. Be more of an inductive type thing.

So it is for safety and the explosive fumes you have to be careful of, batteries will explode.

As for welding on the bike, it would be very hard to do a professional job, as close quartered as it is and trying to get the stinger between the frame and pipe, well, it will look like a chicken with the runs. :D I would simply tack it a bit , remove it, and get it up where I can see it and make a very neat weld. That way it will last.

Kit
 

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The battery does act as a filter for the electrical system, it was not however designed with a welder in mind. Pull the battery and get it out of there. No more worry about vented gases either. And as for welding on vehicles with PCM's, I'd highly recommend disconnecting that too fyi, too many sensitive electronics chips in there to risk. You might get away with it 99 out of a hundred times, but I don't want to be #100 for something so easy to undo/redo.
 

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I appreciate the many replys. Excellent thoughts and some from experience.

I will be tacking the pieces on the bike to ensure proper alignmnent. I will remove the battery and shield the bike from spatter. After tacking, I will complete the welding on the bench.

Thanks !!!!!
 

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I'm a certified welder, I heli arc. I always put the ground next tothe work, as close as possible, current looks for the shortest path. Residual current will flow elsewhere, it's a given. I have and have not disconnected that battery, depends on what I am welding. Yes, you should always disconnect a battery if for safety reasons alone. The computer, you always take your chances, when left hooked up. I've never had a problem, but does not mean I never will. :)
 

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When I was racing cars, I'm sure I have welded on them with the battery connected a few times and never a problem.

With bikes I have always disconnected the battery and have yet to hurt the electronics. (knocks on wood)
 

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Did you ever? Check an ignition system for sparks with a freshly charged battery? BOOM!!!! Acid everywhere, on the ceiling, wall, in my hair, shirt. Ears ringing for a week!

I used to doa lot of bike repairs, 12 hours a day sometimes more for 20 years, take the battery out, please.
 

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Beware the fuel hoses,fuel tank and fuel pump......have a fire extinguisher handy. Good Luck.....
 
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