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Hello all, Merry Christmas Steve. I hope all are safe and well.
I took my bike into a shop near my school for an inspection (I wrote about it awhile ago) just found out that a wire to the fan was pulled out so that the fan would not work. The bike was over heating on short runs I must have PO someone in the inspection bay cause his boss told him to do it right away. I will just wait till Spring to get the bike checked out and fixed. I won't be going there again.

Lets hope life will be better in 2009.
 

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Sax, the GL1500 tends to show high on the temperature gauge before the fans come on. I ride in a rural area, so my fans rarely comes on. So long as you are moving, the air flow through the radiators is enough to suffice enginecooling.

I have been stuck in bumper-to-bumper traffic that did overheat my engine, and brought to my attentionthatthe thermal switchwas bad.I still have not fixed just because I have been lazy and procrastinating.

The electric fanstypicallycost~$10 on ebay since they are probably not a high demand item. I would hate to see the cost at adealer.
 

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Temp gauge will go approx 3/4 before electric fans kicks in. The fans are connected together, so they are either both on or both off.

Check your fluid, even short runs should not have an impact on engine overheated unless you are stopped or idling for several minutes.
 

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I added a bypass switch for the fans when I was riding drill team. Parades is the summer can be a killer on temps. Fan switch works as normal, I just can turn on the fans when ever I want to as well.
 

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Matt G wrote:
I added a bypass switch for the fans when I was riding drill team. Parades is the summer can be a killer on temps. Fan switch works as normal, I just can turn on the fans when ever I want to as well.
What's the point? If the fan switch works then the fans will come on as needed. Switching them on full time when not needed is just a drain on the electrical system which itself will generate additional heat. Using a switch as a pre-emptive effort to keep the temperature lower isn't worth the extra fuel generated and the electrical load. As long as the fans come on as designed the engine won't overheat. If the conditions are so unusually hot that the fans won't keep the engine cool then a switch keeping them on isn't going to help.
 

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I tend to agree with exavid on this one.

I live and work in the Phoenix area and was driving my 1200 and 1500 bikes to work/back every day. Even in 120+ degree heat, the fans would cycle on for a while, then shut off.

Getting stuck in traffic was a bear during those times, but the fans did what they should. Cool it down enough for the thermal switch to turn them off.

If they will cycle off, there is no need to bypass the thermal switch.
 

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Try riding a parade in the valley during the summer, not to mention the pratices, you need the switch.
Drill team riding is hard on cooling, braking, clutch systems on the bike, electrial is one of the least affected as your RPMs are high enough to keep a charge going into the battery. By turning on the fans before you need them, you get more air going thru the radiators keeping them cooler,longer.
When you are stuck in traffic, your are stopped, or running a low RPM, on the drill team, you are always moving in the case of a parade,working the bike hard,keeping yor RPMs between 1500-2000 RPM, while using the brakes and clutch. I have boiled my clutch fluid in Nov, boiled my gas, and suffered brake fade, all from temps. Nothing gets your attenion faster then whe you are diving into your place in formation and all of sudden you have no clutch or rear brake.
BTW, AZgl500, I am a Phx native, living on the west side, and I ride everyday, all weather, so I do know about the heat.
 

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We get heat here too but we get a lot of humidity with it.
My fans cycle a lot down here in GA.

One thing I think the switch is good for is if your thermo switch goes bad at a bad time. You could keep riding rather than repairing.

Another thing to note is that on the 1500 at least, both fans full load current passes through that switch on the way to ground. That is one of the MANY reasons the SaberCycle replacements are crap since they are grossly underrated and badly designed.

I'll be adding a 30 amp relay to sink my fans with and let the switch only have to drive the relay coil.

It's faster and easier to find a stock 30 amp relay than a thermo switch that fits with the right specs and the relay doesn't require coolant loss to change out.

Also if you are a fan switch freak, your switch could be much smaller since it wouldn't be sinking all the fan current itself.
 

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I agree with Rudy that a switch would be a backup if needed but I still tend to go with the KISS principle and like to avoid over-engineering things. I still contend that for cooling the engine the thermoswitch sets a reasonable threshold for fan operation, running the fans sooner does not help the engine, there will be a temperature equilibrium reached regardless of when you turn on the fans whether automatically or manually. There is also no doubt that the increased electrical load of the fans when they are not called for will increase the heating of the engine. It's not a matter of whether your battery will be charged, it's a matter of the heat produced by the electrical system. The fans increase the load so the alternator has to produce more power. You can't produce more power without heating up the alternator more than it was heating before the fans came on. That heat goes somewhere and most of that somewhere is the engine since the alternator is connected to the block with heat conducting metal. The fan in the alternator will not keep the internal temperature rise down to a fixed point as demand increases. The regulator and rectifier will generate additional heat as well. The upshot is that you can't increase the cooling to a significant amount by running the fans before the system senses the need.

Brakes and clutch heating are a totally different matter. The heat from the clutch will somewhat affect the time the fans come on since hotter oil will raise the coolant temperature. The brakes are another matter and are totally independent of the electrical system. Eliminating caliper covers and providing more air flow to the calipers would be a way to help with that. To reduce engine heating the addition of an oil cooler would be a reasonably easy way to prevent overheating in severe use such as parade work in hot weather. An oil cooler with a fan would make sense and help a lot. Leaving the gas flap open might also assist as would leaving the side covers off, that would help reduce hot air trapped inside the fairing that has little air flow through it when slow riding.
 

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I think Sax just needs to get his cooling fan fixed.

From his description, we can not really tell if he failed inspection due to a loose wire - surely not. And, we can not tell it the wire is to the fan motor or thermal switch.

From Sax's previous post/topic, he had a concern with his gauge registering 90 degree which is no concern - normal operation since the temp would be too low for fans to kick in. His other inputs would indicate the same.

But, Sax's discovery of a lose wire could be cut or pulled out from the motor. I assume this was visually seen through the side grills. If it is not this wire, maybe he is talking about the thermo-switch in the lower radiator.
 
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