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Okay after changing the oil of my GL1500 for the first time since owning it, when I checked it, I noticed that it was thin and milky white. Is this normal?

Just so you know, I used standard 10w30 not synthetic or anything. Now I know this is not the correct type of oil, and I don't plan to ride the motorcycle with what's in it. My intent was to just have oil in it so I good start it to run tests as needed. Once spring comes again, I will add the good stuff. I merely used what I had in the garage at the time.

Please tell me about your oils appearance after changing it!
 

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Milky white oil is not normal, sounds like water/coolant maybe getting in there somehow. I changed mine about 3 weeks ago and after 7000 miles on it, it was ust a tad darker than new oil.
 

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kemoloney wrote:
Just so you know, I used standard 10w30 not synthetic or anything. Now I know this is not the correct type of oil,
Not the correct oil? Why not? I have been using standard Valvoline 10w/30 since 1984 in ALL my bikes including 3 Wings. Never had a problem
 

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Definitely water in the oil. Check your coolant level.
 

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Besides the which oil to use discussion, i agree with BLue Addiction that milky white not only isnt normal, isnt good either...Is this the oil the came in the engine? If thats the one u got used did it sit outside before you got it...may have gotten moisture in it from the elements, but i wouldnt run it any more till you change it...then keep close eye on it...
 

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tmdriverwannabe wrote:
Besides the which oil to use discussion, i agree with BLue Addiction that milky white not only isnt normal, isnt good either...Is this the oil the came in the engine? If thats the one u got used did it sit outside before you got it...may have gotten moisture in it from the elements, but i wouldnt run it any more till you change it...then keep close eye on it...
There is a 2-multi-part answer to your question. First, I just replaced my engine, which had a bad transmission, with this one which is supposedly from a wrecked 98 Aspencade that only had 5800 miles on it. The oil was already drained when I picked it up. Yes I believe it sat outside in the elements for awhile and had rags stuffed in both carbs (actually two old T-shirts). I didn't even think about that the fact that it sat outside. However, I just added three quarts of 10w30 last week and after running it a few times, maybe 30 minutes total at various times, this was the appearance and consistency of the oil when checking the dipstick today. Should I drain it and add new oil and a new filter and check it again? Btw, I continued to use the original filter that was on it since I was only testing the bike at this time after the engine swap.
 

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Ok… lets assume the best case scenario….
water in the oil from sitting outside would turn the oil milky white. Try another oil change WITH new filter. See if it's not as milky after the oil change.

You might have to repeat… and then repeat again.

On the other hand…. it doesn't look any better we're talking about possible major repairs.

Cross your fingers.
 

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kemoloney wrote:
tmdriverwannabe wrote:
Besides the which oil to use discussion, i agree with BLue Addiction that milky white not only isnt normal, isnt good either...Is this the oil the came in the engine? If thats the one u got used did it sit outside before you got it...may have gotten moisture in it from the elements, but i wouldnt run it any more till you change it...then keep close eye on it...
There is a 2-multi-part answer to your question. First, I just replaced my engine, which had a bad transmission, with this one which is supposedly from a wrecked 98 Aspencade that only had 5800 miles on it. The oil was already drained when I picked it up. Yes I believe it sat outside in the elements for awhile and had rags stuffed in both carbs (actually two old T-shirts). I didn't even think about that the fact that it sat outside. However, I just added three quarts of 10w30 last week and after running it a few times, maybe 30 minutes total at various times, this was the appearance and consistency of the oil when checking the dipstick today. Should I drain it and add new oil and a new filter and check it again? Btw, I continued to use the original filter that was on it since I was only testing the bike at this time after the engine swap.
For sure change it and run it again. If the oil is milky there is water in the oil, period......Get a different filter too. I'm not sure of the number but they are cheaper at Wally World. Get a couple while you are there.
 

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Change the oil and definitely that filter.

Moisture got into that engine while it was setting around.
 

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I have to believe that it was from the engine sitting outside. If there is water coming into the oil (typical of a blown head gasket on a car) wouldn't there be other symptoms, such as white smoke coming from the exhaust? There are no other indications of water getting into the oil other than what I'm seeing on the dipstick.
 

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kemoloney wrote:
I have to believe that it was from the engine sitting outside. If there is water coming into the oil (typical of a blown head gasket on a car) wouldn't there be other symptoms, such as white smoke coming from the exhaust? There are no other indications of water getting into the oil other than what I'm seeing on the dipstick.
There are other methods for the oil to get into the water. A blown head gasket is but one way. A cracked cylinder a gasket by pass. But I almost have to believe it was from sitting outdoors all that time.
 

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vtxcandyred wrote:
kemoloney wrote:
I have to believe that it was from the engine sitting outside. If there is water coming into the oil (typical of a blown head gasket on a car) wouldn't there be other symptoms, such as white smoke coming from the exhaust? There are no other indications of water getting into the oil other than what I'm seeing on the dipstick.
There are other methods for the oil to get into the water. A blown head gasket is but one way. A cracked cylinder a gasket by pass. But I almost have to believe it was from sitting outdoors all that time.
I have to believe also that it was from sitting outside. I have to "HOPE" too! Btw, I noticed your member name...do you also own a Honda VTX? If so is it the 1300 or the 1800? I had a 2006 VTX1300 Retro, Magenta in color, and boy do I miss that damn thing!
 

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kemoloney wrote:
I have to believe that it was from the engine sitting outside. If there is water coming into the oil (typical of a blown head gasket on a car) wouldn't there be other symptoms, such as white smoke coming from the exhaust? There are no other indications of water getting into the oil other than what I'm seeing on the dipstick.
To answer your question..No..it doesnt have to smoke to be getting or have moisture in it....I do think since it sat outside(besides the rags, metal sweats too) change the oil again, get one of the cheap 6607 filters at walmart too...If it was mine id also buy xtra couple quarts of oil and dump that through too while drain plug is out before putting plug back in and refilling the crankcase...

Then run it for a few minutes and check it again....Sorry to say but as someone else mentioned you may not get itall out with just one more change....Good luck Kevin.....
 

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I agree on flushing and changing it again. I'd put your chances at 90% that it just got some water in it sitting outside. If it really was from a wrecked '98, I expect it would have been in good running condition before the crash. Good luck, and keep us posted.

Steve
 

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Thanks Mark. I'm going to do just that meaning, leave the drain plug open as I pour the oil through, flushing the water out. I'll let you know my results in a few days. Wally World, here I come...
 

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You do want to determine if coolant is getting to your oil. Antifreeze will destroy engine bearings in nothing flat.
 

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i think you need to leave the drain plug in. you need the oil to pickup all the water from inside the engine. I would leave the plug in and possibly overfill. some. Also something like seafoam should be added to oil to help absorb the water. run the engine to get the water thoughly mixed into the oil and drain.if it looks better fill agian and run up to full temp perhaps unplugging the fan to get some more heat and drain again hot. then refill and run for a few hundred miles and do another oil change


wilf
 

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How long are you running it? Is it running long enough to turn the fans on? I would change the oil and filter and then let it run at temperature while checking the radiator for bubbles. With the engine sitting outside there could have been some water left in it plus condensation can build up if the engine isn't allowed to heat up and run at temperature.
 

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What type of damage led to the dismantalling of the `98 Gold Wing? I bought a `96 engine about 10 years ago to go in my `91 Aspencade. Only had 9K on it. Someone had ridden off the road, and hit a concrete culvert. Engine was basically undamaged, but it was missing a cam belt cover. Upon checking the idler pulleys, one must have taken a hit in the accident. Wasn`t spinning like it should. The cam belts in your bike should be replaced before driving much.
I imagine water in the oil might freeze in Ohio over the winter, if left outside in the elements. Did you take note of how much oil you drained out?
Tom Bishop
`98 S.E.
 

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kemoloney wrote:
vtxcandyred wrote:
kemoloney wrote:
I have to believe that it was from the engine sitting outside. If there is water coming into the oil (typical of a blown head gasket on a car) wouldn't there be other symptoms, such as white smoke coming from the exhaust? There are no other indications of water getting into the oil other than what I'm seeing on the dipstick.
There are other methods for the oil to get into the water. A blown head gasket is but one way. A cracked cylinder a gasket by pass. But I almost have to believe it was from sitting outdoors all that time.
I have to believe also that it was from sitting outside. I have to "HOPE" too! Btw, I noticed your member name...do you also own a Honda VTX? If so is it the 1300 or the 1800? I had a 2006 VTX1300 Retro, Magenta in color, and boy do I miss that damn thing!
I still have the bike. Its an 02 retro. They only made the 1800 then. I do LOVE it. Nothing quite like it. The roll on power is imense.
 
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