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I was watching a movie this evening called Evelyn and it got me thinking about this site and why it feels like such a good place to hang out. It appears that the Irish are quite different than N. Americans in that they, for the most part, all seem to know how to enjoy life better with friendsand really have a good old fashioned grasp on family and good virtue and most have a wonderful sense of humor and can easily share in good times and also care enough to lend support in bad times. I have seenthe Irish grace and dignitymodeled first hand here when my big mouth opened before my footgot a chance to step on my tongue, yet, my faux pas was always handled gracefully and accurately without causing anyone any harm. I always thought that it was just the great technical info that made this site so appealing, but, it's definately more than that, it's the Irish heart and spirit that makes this site so wondreful.

I just want to thank you Irish folk for allowing me into your part of the world and teaching me some things that I would have never achieved otherwise. If you folks are ever over the big pond near my humble little town, by all means touch bases with me and the first pint will be on me.

Ride safe, Vic
 

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Here, here, Vic. I completely agree with your sentiments. I would also like to add that Canadians in general appear to be "more Irish" than we Americans. I have often fancied a trip, or even an extended stay, in the Great White North.

Maybe someday my Wing and I will find our way to your country!

Jack

Knoxville, TN USA
 

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I share Vics sentiments. The Irish know how to put things into perspective (maybe because of centuries of battling with foreign invaders) and if the forum here is anything to go by, they also know how to make everyone feel welcome. Even though we US and Canadian members probably now outnumber the Irish here, the Irish spirit of friendliness and good humour shines through and this is what makes this the best Goldwing forum around. Thanks to the wingnut for this marvellous creation, to wexman for his intuitive and sensitive moderation and to the eagle-eyed Redwing for his"welcome at the door" to new members. :clapper:
 

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Well, I think its more to do with battling endless rainy days, than centuries of battling with foreign invaders, that leaves you witha choice of having a cheery disposition or becoming a manic depressive :goofygrin:
 

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I know perhaps a wee bit about the Irish as I am Irish by blood as they say. The spirit you see here is not at all unusual. Let me tell you a story.

We lived in Venezuela, my wife and I. She is Venezuelan. During the recent troubles there, the Irish consulate actually rang us up to suggest that we seek her Irish citizenship and passport. He explained that should the frontiers shut down as many expected might happen, or at a minimum the passports be selectively cancelled; he would have the devil of the time helping us out.

His advice was sage and we followed it. I cannot begin to describe all the courtesies extended to us by the consulate in Venezuela, the Embassy in Mexico City, the Ministry in Dublin and private Irishmen and women scattered around the world as we went through the process. It took a year, but never once did we feel apprehensive because of the Irish who helped us out along the way.

We were able to spend our remaining time in Venezuela secure that we could leave if my wife's Venezuelan passport were cancelled. Wee boat ride to a friendly island, present her Irish passport and off we go. Luckily we got out before that was ever needed, it may not ever be. But as Peter said when he called, "I would not want to be in a position of not being able to help".

That same spirit permeates this board and has caused me to swell with pride at that beautiful harp on my passport, it is an honour to have the term Irishman applied to you.

I am looking forward to the day when my raven haired, olive skinned, dark eyed beauty walks up to immigrations at Shannon Airport and responds to the question, "Nationality?" with "Is Eireannach me!!". May raise the first eyebrow there!

By the way, in the Patheon in Caracas with full honours at the side of Simon Bolivar, the George Washington of South America; lies the body of Generalisimo Daniel Francis O'Leary of County Cork, Bolivar's right hand man and another helpful and particularly brave Irishman.
 

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Brojees, should that not be Daniel Francis O'Leary? My history might be a bit vague, but I recall learning about Daniel Francis O'Leary who joined the fight for South American Independance in 1819. We could have done with more like him over here, we might have had a fully united and independent Ireland by now.
 

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Quoted from Venezuela's Irish Legacy Copyright 1991 by Brian McGinn

One thousand men of the Irish Legion landed on Venezuela's Margarita Island in August 1819, after a 4,500-mile sea voyage from Dublin. These soldiers of fortune, many of them recently demobilized veterans of the Napoleonic Wars, now sought fame and adventure in the armies of South America's Liberator, Simon Bolivar. In the years 1819 and 1820, more than 2,100 Irish soldiers reached Venezuela as members of organized Irish regiments. But the rosters of British units were also studded with such names as Murphy, Larkin, Egan, Casey, Lanagan and McCarthy, testifying to the presence of hundreds of additional Irish troops. Bolivar dearly valued the dedication and experience of his Irish officers. He appointed a Kerryman, Dr. Thomas Foley, inspector general of his military hospitals. Arthur Sandes, also from Kerry, rose to brigadier-general under Bolivar and had a street named after him in the city of Cuenca, Ecuador. Bolivar owed his life to another Irishman, Lieutenant-Colonel William Ferguson from Antrim, who died defending the Liberator from political rivals. But it was a junior officer from County Cork, Daniel Florence O'Leary, who won Bolivar's highest esteem. After observing the young Corkonian in action, Bolivar made O'Leary his personal aide-de-camp. As a member of Bolivar's headquarters, O'Leary attained the rank of brigadier general and played a key role in plotting political and military strategy. O'Leary's keen historical instincts, combined with his meticulous collection of war documents, earned the Irishman a place of honor in Latin America's history. His memoirs, published in Caracas by his son, Simon Bolivar O'Leary, fill 32 volumes. This extraordinary compilation of eyewitness accounts, correspondence and documents has proved an indispensable resource for every subsequent biographer and historian of the Independence period. In Colombia, where O'Leary died of a cerebral hemorrhage in 1854, a bust of the Irish hero overlooks a plaza in Bogota, the capital. In 1882, the Venezuelan government removed O'Leary's remains to its own capital, Caracas. There, with high public honors, the scholarly soldier was laid to rest in the National Pantheon, the sacred burial place of Bolivar himself.
You may well be right, but some brave men remained as well.
 
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Hey you crowd :waving:Im nearly in tears reading all these nice comments. :crying: This forum is a great place of fun, excitement, :jumper:and help for all the riders of Honda Goldwings. :18red:I have worked in many countries around this old world and the same comments are always said about the Irish. :clapper:We never feel that about ourselves :stumped:it's only when some stranger makes a comment that it dawns on you that we must be doing something right. :weightlifter:It's great to have so many nationalities involved here and we all get along so well. :clapper:

So keep up the good work and enjoy the forum. :skipping:

:walker::18red::walker:
 

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Take it easy Brojees, there's going to be a bunch of guys who can't get their hats on! It takes all kinds. While I wil own up to having an Irish grandfather, love Celtic music, Could listen to John McDermott for hours, think Harp is a fine libation, on the other hand have you ever seen an Irish restaurant outside Ireland?

:cheeky1::cheeky1::cheeky1::cheeky1:
 

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A lot of Irishmen fought in many oher countries as well. There were Irish mercenaries in various parts of Africa for a start and also many Irishmen fought in the two World Wars (which didn't always go down well because they served in the same British army that still occupied all or part of Ireland).
I had an uncle who was in the RAF in WW2 and a grand-uncle who was in the British Navy in WW1.The grand-unclegot some stick for his efforts, even though he did his bit for freedomin the war of independence after hegot home. :)
 

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I totally agree with all of ya !

A bunch of Good Lads you are !

I feel like doing a "River Dance" !!

 
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wingdawg101 wrote:
I totally agree with all of ya !

A bunch of Good Lads you are !

I feel like doing a "River Dance" !!


Hey wingdawg101 :waving:What about an old time waltz. :clapper:We could get Littlejohn to provide the music with his Accordion. :clapper:

:leprechaun::18red::leprechaun:
 

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Now that would be worth the price of "Air Fare" if "little Johns" on the "Music box",Ha!!
 
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