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Everyone says that but I have yet to see any one show proof.
You need proof? Run the engine with the old belts until one fails. Your proof will be your blown engine. Or spend a weekend and get it straight, or pay a guy. Rubber in tires AND belts are safe for 7-10 years. Miles will reduce these numbers. Period. It’s like gravity.
 

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With regard to the belts I have seen many posts over the years on this forum and others, mainly from new owners to a bike, asking whether the belts should be changed as the mileage is low but the bike is old. For me, the answer is always the same...change the belts. When I've had a new to me bike I figured the peace of mind of knowing the belts are new is far better than trying to convince myself they don't need doing yet.
Well said. Given we are talking GL1200 or 1500s, these bikes are now OLD. Honda engineers setting mileage numbers for maintenance or replacement were not considering maintenance decades later.

I bought my GL1200 in 2008 with only 14K miles on it. Regardless of miles, the bike was then 24 years old. So I immediately changed the radiator hoses. I would have also changed the belts, but the original owner kept good paperwork and I found a receipt for timing belt service in 2006.

In 2016, after my stator was dead for a year, and I was tired of charging my bike after every cruise, I pulled the engine, did the stator and among other service and cleaning, of course I installed new timing belts. I’m thinking $15 each at Napa for Gates belts. Of course the belts I replaced looked new.

So my ‘84 Standard today with only 26,500 miles has had at least 3 sets of timing belts. That comes to changing on average every 8800 miles. It’s more the years than the miles, unless you’re Dennis and have 290K miles on your Wing.

I’m changing tires this week, not because the tread is bald. It’s because the DOT manufacturers date is 2012. I don’t wear out my tires. That’s hard to do when you have 4 street bikes. I’m not going highway speeds with tires 7+ years old. Thanks for reading. JD
 

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Really, I didn't know they'd gotten rid of that headache, so what do these here new fangled 1800's have now?

A chain? Or maybe something really bulletproof, like push-rods, or desmodromic shafts perhaps?

I really would like to know!

Because I never had an ounce of worry when I had either of those.
 

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Really, I didn't know they'd gotten rid of that headache, so what do these here new fangled 1800's have now?

A chain? Or maybe something really bulletproof, like push-rods, or desmodromic shafts perhaps?

I really would like to know!

Because I never had an ounce of worry when I had either of those.
They have chains. Same on most Honda cars these days with few problems. The only ones I ever saw have a problem had a fram oil filter. Just like the early days of Honda when using a fram would cause the cam bearing surfaces to gaul.
 

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They have chains. Same on most Honda cars these days with few problems. The only ones I ever saw have a problem had a fram oil filter. Just like the early days of Honda when using a fram would cause the cam bearing surfaces to gaul.
Well I guess the chain won the battle then, but all those Triumphs, Norton's and BSA's where definitely fun bikes, as where the later Ducati's.

Not to mention the fact that, (well I guess I am.) Major US manufacturers would make V8 racing engines with push-rods, specifically for the Indianapolis 500 mile race. Right up until the early 90's.

Gotta be a good reason for that, ain't there??
 

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I thought 5 yrs from DOT stamp on tires? rubber things? a blow out on a car/truck tire is a PROBLEM... a blowout from dried out tires on a bike is CATASTROPHIC. ... i wud think. im trying to figure out how to mark the timing belt covers so the next owner knows that the belts were changed @... month/yr. when i get brave enough to change the belts, if i get brave enough to change the belts. getting the radiator cap off to get radiator out ... might be a challenge. i read it is a thumb and one finger deal and i have.... all thumbs. unless im playing cards... then i have "a hand.... like a foot" ;) anyway, engraver on top of belt guard, primitive but functional.
 

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On a 4 cylinder wings you only have to take off the shelter to get to the cap and the bottom of the radiator will swing out to get the belt covers off. Hold it back with a bungee.

Sent from my SM-J320V using Tapatalk
 

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I thought 5 yrs from DOT stamp on tires? rubber things? a blow out on a car/truck tire is a PROBLEM... a blowout from dried out tires on a bike is CATASTROPHIC. ... i wud think. im trying to figure out how to mark the timing belt covers so the next owner knows that the belts were changed @... month/yr. when i get brave enough to change the belts, if i get brave enough to change the belts. getting the radiator cap off to get radiator out ... might be a challenge. i read it is a thumb and one finger deal and i have.... all thumbs. unless im playing cards... then i have "a hand.... like a foot" ;) anyway, engraver on top of belt guard, primitive but functional.
Gates/Napa belts come with a sticker you can fill out and stick on it somewhere, like on the air cleaner cover. You are going to have to take the shelter off anyway to be able to fill the radiator. It's not a hard job.
 

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My local Discount tire would not even top off my doughnut spare a few weeks ago, because it was over 10 years old, and I was there spending $500 on new front tires .
 
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