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If I want to clean up the cylinders in my 1982 GL1100 what size of Dingleberry hone do I need to get? Thank you for your advice.
 

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The bore is 75mm, 3".
 

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I would use the hone with 3 spring actuated stones,just my preffference
 

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It really depends what you want to achieve with the hone. For a light scuff the dingle ball hone will work fine. If you want to remove material a multi stone hone is better. There are two basic types of stone hones: one is the precision hone like a Sunnen hone. I’ve got several ranging from 25mm (1 1/4”) up to 130mm (@5.5”). The other stone hone type is a spring type. They are not precision like a Sunnen. If you bore a cylinder you need a precision hone to make sure the cylinder stays perfectly straight. Otherwise the dingle ball hone will be fine. Use one 3” or 76mm. The bore is 75mm. You need a hone a little larger than the more so the pressure will score the cylinder. Amazon has one for $35.99. Not cheap.
 

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I have used the balls and I think they were OK. The spring loaded just seemed to fly around and burnish the cylinder walls. Like Ray said, a real Sunnen hone is the best way to go but that is very expensive for once or twice.
The best luck I had I learned from an Old Guy who worked in an automotive machine shop for years. You need to have some imagination but it works great and it is cheap to free. Start out with something that is round and smaller than the bore you are going to hone. I have used hole saws quite a bit. Remove the 1/4" drill and replace it with 1/4" round stock to chuck the saw to for longer reach if necessary. Chuck it in your drill. A heavy duty slow variable drill will be best to get the correct crosshatch. Now wrap a cloth around the holesaw or whatever you come up with. Make sure you wrap it in the direction the drill is going to turn so it tries to wrap up and not unwrap. Wrap enough cloth that it is just about snug but not really. Use duct tape to fasten the cloth to the holesaw. Now get some 220 grit silicon Carbide sandpaper. Only use silicon carbide as it is the only media that will stand up to the job. Where the cloth ends (the tail) tape the sandpaper to the tail and wrap the sandpaper around the holesaw just like the cloth. Hopefully the unit will slip in just right. Not so easy as it just drops in (needs another wrap of cloth) and not so tight you can't get it in without wrinkling the sandpaper. (need a little less cloth). Hit the trigger quite slow and stroke it up and down being careful not to hit the web at the bottom. The bottom is not important. The crosshatch should be about 45 degrees. If it is too flat speed up the up and down motion. If is is too vertical speed up the drill or slow down the up down motion.
I have used this method many times in my life and was always pleased with the results but really liked the price.

In stock at my O Reiley's:
https://www.oreillyauto.com/detail/b/masterpro-refinishing-4363/paint---body-repair-16614/abrasive-accessories-25121/sandpaper-25278/c68ef86e2e40/masterpro-refinishing-220-wet-dry-sandpaper/41406/4511195
 
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