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Hi, my ailing neighbourgifted me this bike. It has not run in at least seven years & hesaid the engine was seized. Brought it home & bumped itin gear;it turned over albeit reluctantly at first. Sprayed Kroil in the plug holes and will leave itfor now. It could use, imo, a complete overhaul due to sitting outside under a tarp for so long. By looking at pictures it does appear to be all there. Have ridden beemers for many years so no Wing experience buthave long appreciated Honda engineering.This isa winter project in my garage and wonderwhere to start. I've got lots of tools etc and can also use them (really).
P.S. according to odometer it only has 30K kms on it
 

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Izbit wrote:
Hi, my ailing neighbourgifted me this bike. It has not run in at least seven years & hesaid the engine was seized. Brought it home & bumped itin gear;it turned over albeit reluctantly at first. Sprayed Kroil in the plug holes and will leave itfor now. It could use, imo, a complete overhaul due to sitting outside under a tarp for so long. By looking at pictures it does appear to be all there. Have ridden beemers for many years so no Wing experience buthave long appreciated Honda engineering.This isa winter project in my garage and wonderwhere to start. I've got lots of tools etc and can also use them (really).
P.S. according to odometer it only has 30K kms on it
People have been known to mistake dying starters for a seized engine.



Start with a new battery, you'll need it to trouble shoot anyway.



Add some 10w40 to each spark plug hole and compression test it. That'll tell you if anything major is wrong right off the bat.



If that all looks good, clean up the fuel system (rusty tank), put a fresh fuel filter on it, make sure the oil level is good, and see if she'll fire. If so........you'll probably need to pull the carbs and clean 'em, then sync 'em to get it to run right. After that....well, just inspect/replace all the standard bike parts that wear....brakes, tires, etc. Check the drive fluid. Check the timing belts, you may even want to just replace 'em to make sure. From there......ride it like you stole' it.
 

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Unless water actually got into the engine (in which case it would really be stuck), I wouldNOT start by taking the engine apart.. I'd focus on the carburators (and other parts of the fuel system)and next electrical and ignition.. after that, it may run..
 

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look on randakks site.... really good tips on starting up an older wing that has sat



and change the timing belts
 

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Mine sat in a back pasture for ~6 years. Ended up having to thoroughly disassemble, clean and rebuild the carbs with the Randakk kit. Did the belts just because they were old (looked fine though). The junk in my front forks was black so refilled with ATF, but now one leg leaks so...



BTW replace the 'dogbone' main fuse before you do anything. Install a normal blade type from a kit at Autozone, etc.
 

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Izbit wrote:
This isa winter project in my garage and wonderwhere to start.
Start at the beginning.:action:

Hi Izbit. That odometer may have rolled over. Either way, don't think the worst. GL motors are tough. Carbs, cooling system, brakes, tires and misc. rubber pieces are what will keep you busy on the bike.

If you are really a good wrench, like you say, I expect you'll be riding the bike by noon tomorrow! :cooldevil:
 

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A good idea with an engine that's been sitting for a long time is to pull the rocker covers and hand turn the engine while watching for a lot of slack in any rocker lash. Often if an engine sits for a long time without preparation the valves may stick in the guides. If you crank over the engine with a valve stuck down in an interference engine like that of a Goldwing it's very possible to bend one. The rocker covers should come off anyway so that you can oil the valve stems before cranking the engine over. Carbs probably will require cleaning, it wouldn't hurt to take a look at the timing belts, if they are original, and I'd suspect they are it would be a good idea to change them due to their advanced age. The coolant, oil, final drive oil, and the brake fluid should all be changed. Check out the fuel tank to make sure there's not a lot of rust in it. Be prepared to have the tank cleaned by a radiator shop if a lot of rust is present. Tires should probably be replaced due to age. Just go over the old machine, fix or repair what neglect has done to it and then you'll have one fine machine.
Helm Inc. reprints hard copy editions of the original Honda service manuals, they are excellent and for $36 one of the best things you can buy for your bike. .
 

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Thx for all the replies, will start with the 'easier' stuff and work inward from there; lots of good common sense posts from you folks too. Can't have it on the road by tomorrow noon tho as I'm leaving for a three week tour on my '07 BMW RT or there would have been serious activity. My wife watched me like a hawk today each time I went into the garage, she knows I'm itching to get the wrenches out..Hope to have this old bike on the road for next spring tho, repainted and running like a Wing should. Gary in Edmonton.
 

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Hi, got into this bike this aft using Clymer manual for years 1975-81. Removed the gas tank following the book, finally realized 'slide tank to the rear' really meant remove the rear wheel & shocks in order to finally get it out. Is the Haynes better than the Clymer? Hope so or this will be a long rebuild with no prior Wing experience. The interior of the tank has quite a bit of rust altho much of it flushed out using a garden hose. So far so good...
 

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Izbit wrote:
It could use, imo, a complete overhaul due to sitting outside under a tarp for so long.
I don't fix what is not broken. If you want to have fun, why don't you take whole bike apart?

Diagnosing first, then repair.
 

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Once I had a set of keys cut and got the seat off, found a rust hole in the frame rail about an inch long above the battery tray.Guessing water from the torn seat dripped there for years.Will tear the bike apart & strip the frameto check for further rust, cracks,holes etc.; willmig weld to repair if the rest is no worse. Cheaper than spending the winter in front of the tube watching sports & drinking beer...Any opinions on the Haynes manual?
 

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Get mirror on stick to inspect frame. Welders can weld it for probably 20-40 doll. You just need to make patch.
 

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Bish wrote

Add some 10w40 to each spark plug hole and compression test it. That'll tell you if anything major is wrong right off the bat.
Check compression but don't worry too much about low numbers. I had 76 with 0 compression, it was running fine later. If you start engine with half bottle of ATF in oil compression will improve usually.
 

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I cannot over-emphasis that the timing belts WILL need to be replaced. They will probably look fine but they normally will not SHOW wear. That is why many don't get replaced, then break. When this happens you are probably looking at a new engine or at the very least MAJOR repairs.

:clapper:
 

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So far the mechanicals seem to be in great shape for the age and being stored outside for years. Turned over the engine via the front crank pulley, very smooth operation; I'm impreseed withHonda's build quality and it does not appear major repairs are necessary. Reading the Haynes/Clymer manuals it seems prudent to pull the engine and replace the alternator stator;alsoreplace the old CDI. Any recommendations foraftermarket sources for high quality electronics for this bike? I want to replacewheel bearings,belts & hoses, seals, other rubber pieces on this thirty year old bike.Rebuild the calipers, master cylinders and S/S brake lines. Plan to gift it to my twenty year old nephew, he rides a 600 crotch rocket andwants to see more of the world on a proper touring bike. So safety and reliability is foremost in mind.
 

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The 1100 series is very reliable . I would not toss the stator without having it running first and know its bad . If the stator plug to mainharness seems to have been overheated its recomended to cut it out and soldier the wires together and seal with heat shrink tube . Also the "Dog Bone fuse " at the battery box is known to go bad . IT is commonly replaced with a "Blade" type fuse assy. Is the CDI bad ? really id clean the carbs fuel system and see if it runs. Sometimes the CDI /spark ignitier boxes might look as though they leaked out there insulation . Lots of folks here with them still running like that . Some have poured epoxy into them .
 
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