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I am thinking of new fork springs for my 98SE as mine seem a bit soft (only 23k miles) the Progressive Suspension ones get good reviews (£95 in UK - $60 in USA - we get ripped off again!!) but I have seen Hagon do progressive springs for £60.

Has anyone had experience of the Hagon's?
 

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Welcome to the nest Nitrowing... :clapper:

What is Hagon? Is that the name of the springs or the company that sells Progressive springs?

I'm surprised your fork springs are mushy at such low mileage.. OEM springs are usually good for much longer than that... Is it possible the air system on your machine is bleeding down or not pumping up the front forks properly? :12beige:
 

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Welcome Nitrowing. I thought Hagon only did complete shocks, I wasn't aware that they did fork springs for teh Goldwing. I've never heard of anyone using Hagon springs in their Wing forks, but of course I could be wrong. The problem is that you may not get a lot of opinions on Hagons as everyone seems to upgrade the front end to Progressives.
BTW, don't forget to update your profile to include where you come from. It's a great help knowing what country we are all from. :)
 

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Thank you and hello :)

Hagon http://www.hagon-shocks.co.uk/main1st.htmmake their own suspension.

I'm not sure on the air pressure - I'll check it again this evening. It's a case of the suspension being very soft - wallowing and death-weaving at high speed cornering. I'm putting Avon's on in 2 weeks (half the price of other makes) instead of the Elite II that are nearly worn to their limit.

The bike is generally too soft - the front brake is atrocious, even with new pads, so I'm putting a braided steel line on there - but am considering hooking both calipers up to the lever rather than have the back brake controlling the front.
 

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Hi Nitrowing. Before you replace the springs, I'd get the fork oil replaced. It only lasts about 2 years on the 1500 before turning to paste and if the wallowing is as bad as you say I doubt the oil has ever been replaced. See how the bike handles with new oil before splashing out on new springs.
 

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I was going to do that at the same time...

Would you recommend Honda ATF or 15w or something else? My main riding is solo...
 

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Nitrowing wrote:
I was going to do that at the same time...

Would you recommend Honda ATF or 15w or something else? My main riding is solo...
I have Progressives in the forks and 416 shocks on the rear and can say it does stiffen up the suspension, feels a lot more sure footed in the corners to me. The 416s come in three spring rates, I have the stiffest -1633s. Also you can run up the air pressure in both shocks instead of only one as with the stock setup. I'm running SAE15 in the fork. Might be a bit too much in real cold weather.
 

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If you are going to put braided hose on the front can i suggest you do the same on the rear. Had my 1500 done and it made the bike feel a different bike altogether when braking. worth the time and the money

Also did the clutch line at the same time.

rgds

Phil
 

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Phil wrote:
If you are going to put braided hose on the front can i suggest you do the same on the rear. Had my 1500 done and it made the bike feel a different bike altogether when braking. worth the time and the money
Also did the clutch line at the same time.

Phil
Sounds like a good idea to me too, Phil. I'm not too concerned about the clutch since it doesn't get the high pressure the brakes do, but the reinforced lines sound good, especially in a panic stop, I'd sure hate to have one let go.
 

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I've never normally bothered with braided lines on the rear brake as it doesn't usually need too much force to lock up. I'm tempted to hook both front calipers to the master cylinder so that I am control in the conventional motorbike manner!

The clutch line is getting braided too but only for aesthetics.
 

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Nitrowing wrote:
The bike is generally too soft - the front brake is atrocious, even with new pads, so I'm putting a braided steel line on there - but am considering hooking both calipers up to the lever rather than have the back brake controlling the front.
if you hook both front brakes to a master cylinder meant for only one brake you will not have enough power to totally depress the brakes.... tried that on my '86 when I had a sidecar brake attached to the rear brake and ran both off the front. the lever went all the way to the handle. Ended up using a master cylinder off an earlier wing which was meant for two brakes and it worked.
 
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