Steve Saunders Goldwing Forums banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 20 of 28 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,079 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
imported post

I just got the 84 Aspy back together after changing my front tire and took it for a ride. It has a whine sound to it now that sounds like bearings. Also the front end feels extremely heavy now.

I had my front wheel loose about a month ago to change out my rotor covers. I could not get the left cover off without removing the nut on the end of the axel. When I replaced the nut, I found that I did not have a socket big enough to fit the nut so I guesstimated the torque using an open end wrench. I had no problems and the bike operated normally and I had no noises and the front end felt the way it did before I messed with it.

Now, When I was putting it back together after replacing the front tire, I had a socket and torqued it down to what the book says. I have bearing noise and the front end feels very tight and heavy.

I just talked with a friend of mine and he asked one of his co-workers, who was rode nbikes all his life and he said that he never torques the front axel down to what the book says. He claims that it is far too tight and it will cause bearing noise. He says that he just tightens them down very snugly and does not worry about torque and has never had a problem.

Would it hurt to back it off a little and see what happens? I don't think that once everythig is together that there is anyway for the axel to come apart is there? All opinions are welcome as I need to get this thing back on the road.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,491 Posts
imported post

1984GL1200A wrote:
I just got the 84 Aspy back together after changing my front tire and took it for a ride. It has a whine sound to it now that sounds like bearings. Also the front end feels extremely heavy now.

I had my front wheel loose about a month ago to change out my rotor covers. I could not get the left cover off without removing the nut on the end of the axel. When I replaced the nut, I found that I did not have a socket big enough to fit the nut so I guesstimated the torque using an open end wrench. I had no problems and the bike operated normally and I had no noises and the front end felt the way it did before I messed with it.

Now, When I was putting it back together after replacing the front tire, I had a socket and torqued it down to what the book says. I have bearing noise and the front end feels very tight and heavy.

I just talked with a friend of mine and he asked one of his co-workers, who was rode nbikes all his life and he said that he never torques the front axel down to what the book says. He claims that it is far too tight and it will cause bearing noise. He says that he just tightens them down very snugly and does not worry about torque and has never had a problem.

Would it hurt to back it off a little and see what happens? I don't think that once everythig is together that there is anyway for the axel to come apart is there? All opinions are welcome as I need to get this thing back on the road.
1984GL1200A, there is a spacer inside the front wheel hub that spaces the inner bearing races apart. Because of that spacer the front axle nut torque (as long as within reason) should have no effect on the wheel bearing peload. DO NOT leave that axle nut loose as that keeps the forks lined up & keeps the load even on the axle when a bump is hit.

Did you get the R/H lower fork cap back on facing the correct direction? Also make sure the wheel spacers are in the correct location so the front rotors are centered precisely between the front forks.

Did you get the speedometer drive back on correctly? It's also possible you changed the wheel off-set side to side & have a front brake rotor dragging in a caliper or you have a sticking caliper that won't retract & is now dragging a front brake.

It's even possible you have a failing front wheel bearing.

Twisty
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,079 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
imported post

Fork caps are on with arrows facing forward.

As I took things apart, I laid all out so that parts from the right stayed on the right and parts from the left stayed on the left. I followed the book step by step while putting back together.

I was by no means going to leave the axel loose, I was just going to back it off a little and maybe only put it down to say 20 or 30 lbs torque instead of the 44 that the book calls for. 44 seems awful tight.

You mentioned a spacer inside the wheel hub that spaces the bearings. Is that something that is inside the wheel? Would I see this spacer without removing the bearings? Could it fall out some way?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,938 Posts
imported post

Don't know about 1200's but i swore my bearing on my 1100 was making noise after changing the tire and it turned out to be the Speedo drive and cable, sounded just like a bearing!:baffled:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,491 Posts
imported post

1984GL1200A wrote:
You mentioned a spacer inside the wheel hub that spaces the bearings. Is that something that is inside the wheel? Would I see this spacer without removing the bearings? Could it fall out some way?
1984GL1200A, that spacer is inside the front wheel hub & runs between the bearings. You should be able to see it (looks like a piece of pipe running between the bearings inside the wheel hub). It can't fall out & I don't think it can move inside the hub far enough to allow the axle through without going through that spacer.

Front axle nut torque shouldn't matter (within reason) as it would have to collapse that spacer pipe to effect bearing preload.

Twisty
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
137 Posts
imported post

Twisty... Your on the ball...:clapper:

My 1982 Sabre has the same setup in the front rim/hub. Both bearing hold the piece of pipe in place. There is also a collar on the pipe to keep it from possibly slipping out on reassembly of the front axle.

I would check both bearing in the hub, the speedo gear/hub, and brake caliper.

It great to hang around with some great minds...:goofygrin::grinner:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,079 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
imported post

Well, I just went out and dismantled my front end and re-built it again. Took the bike for a short ride and heard the noise again. I think that I have discounted the wheel noise and am now looking at something else.

I just read another post Noise on an 85 Aspencade and I believe that this is also my problem. I took the bike out and got up to about 35 and pulled in the clutch and that is when I heard the noise. It lessened in intensity with a decrease in speed. I went back and forth on the road by my house listening to the noise. On one pass, I shifted the bike into neutral and the noise was gone. I now feel that the noise is internal and may just be the transmission whine.

I have to admit that after replacing the wheel and riding the bike for the first time, I was listening for anything and when I heard this, I freaked. I now think that this niose has always been present but just never noticed or just plain ignored as normal.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,191 Posts
imported post

 To quiet some transmission,and gear noises..: try a quart of MMO in your oil for 300 miles or so (drain a quart of oil first ), and then drain,and change the oil ,and oil filter..                                                                                                                                      You should have been able to hear bearing "noise" in the front wheel when you changed the tire ... I assume you spun the tire a few times ,before lowering the bike off the jack ??...                                                                 Personally, since its speed related ... (is it gear related ??)  I highly suspect the speedometer gear box.. take it off, and remount it and see.. SilverDave/forums/images/emoticons/emoticonsxtra/cooldj.gif
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,079 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
imported post

Thanks for the reply SilverDave but as I stated in my previous post, I have eliminated the front wheel as the source of the sound. As I said, I got the bike up to speed and then pulled in the clutch to coast, I heard the noise. I then done it again only this time, I shifted into neutral and coasted and there was no noise. This is why I am now convinced that it is in the tranny. Unless someone knows different, I am going to concentrate on the innards of the motor / tranny.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,938 Posts
imported post

Unless I'm not understanding the problem correctly it sounds like "Clutch Whine", Which the plates need cleaning via "Sea Foam" or the Clutch needs "Springs etc"!:baffled:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,882 Posts
imported post

okay, I will ask for forgiveness ahead of time for this.....

but.....

would you like some cheese with that wine?:gunhead::crying:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,079 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
imported post

wingdawg101 wrote:
it sounds like "Clutch Whine", Which the plates need cleaning via "Sea Foam"
This is my next project. I am going to drain off about a quart of oil and fill it back up with either Seafoam or MMO and runit for a while and then drain and install a new filter and fill it up with fresh Castrol GTX 20W50 oil. I believe that the PO (which lived in Minnesota) was running 5w oil and I think that is way to thin for the Kansas heat.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,191 Posts
imported post

............ 5 weight ? ..........5 WEIGHT ??? ........they make 5 Weight ? wow...  that's sewing machine oil,isn't it ? LOL SilverDave/forums/images/emoticons/emoticonsxtra/cooldj.gif
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,079 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
imported post

My Toyota Tacoma runs 5W30. It is almost the consistency of milk. I believe that that is what is in my wing.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,079 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
imported post

rcmatt007 wrote:
okay, I will ask for forgiveness ahead of time for this.....

but.....

would you like some cheese with that wine?:gunhead::crying:
I'd take a nice hunk of Maytag Blue Cheese. :goofygrin: :grinner: :goofygrin: :grinner:
 

·
Postpubescent member
Joined
·
36,382 Posts
imported post

1984GL1200Ais the tire on the same way, ie. does the rotation arrow point in the direction of actual tire rotation? That could affect the handling. As for the noise how about trying some heavier bodied oil like Delo 400? I really doubt that flushing will do much to eliminate noises. 44 ft/lbs is nothing for a thread that size. Gear whine is the nature of the beast, my bike is especially whiney in 4th around 35-40. One simple cure is to turn the radio up a bit.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,079 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
imported post

Thanks Paul. The noise is transmission/clutch related. I am no longer worried about it. I do believe that it was there before the tire change and I was just listening too hard for something that wasn't there.

As for the handling, I am chocking that one up to the grip of the new tire.

As I said, the oil in the bike now is very thin and I am going to change it to 20w50 Castrol. Should make things much quieter.
 

·
Postpubescent member
Joined
·
36,382 Posts
imported post

The brochure that came with my new Dunlops did mention taking it easy for the first 100 miles to wear off the mold release from the tire. It can make it slip more easily.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,079 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
imported post

Thanks for that Paul. I'll keep that in mind. I rode about 10 miles on them today (had to make it a quickie...thunderstorm moving in) and they perform quite nicely. My old rear tire was cupped so I really noticed an improvement in the rear. The front was ok but I think the "tighter" handling is the fact that the new tire has far better grip. I like the way the bike handles now. I just have to get used to it being tight. I was so used to it being loose and the cupped rear tire shifting while cornering that it feels so much different now. I will be taking it easy until I get used to the new set up. It is like riding a new bike.

:jumper: :clapper: :banana: :dance: :jumper: :clapper: :banana: :dance: :jumper: :clapper: :banana::dance:
 

·
Postpubescent member
Joined
·
36,382 Posts
imported post

1984GL1200A wrote:
that it feels so much different now. I will be taking it easy until I get used to the new set up. It is like riding a new bike.
For the first day or so after I had the new tires on it felt like the rear was skidding when I went around corners such as at an intersection. The rear end just felt like it was running on grease. I don't think it was from the mold release, don't think the tire was actually slipping, it's just because the bike was handling like it should, after a day or two it felt really good. I suspect a lot of it was the rear, and front, to someextent, had a wide flat spot worndown the center of the treadand now with a properly rounded cross section the bike would lean into the turns with much less effort. That might be what you are feeling, the bike running like it's supposed to.
 
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top