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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been back on two wheels about 3 weeks now and feeling pretty comfortable. Just got my motorcycle endorsement and am riding legal. I am dying to get my wife on the back and she wants to ride when I'm ready. I am just a little nervous about having someone with me. Not that I don't want to take her or my kids. Any pointers or tips would be awesome !!!!
 

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Start with some empty parking lot rides to get used to the slow speed handling maneuvers, get those down first then once comfortable in all scenarios give it s try on the road.
Did you take a motorcycle safety course?
 

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If you are nervous, that is nature's way of telling you you are not ready yet Give it some time, and get out there and ride. Your life would really suck if you had an accident that severely injured or killed a loved one.
 

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after your practice times in a parking lot alone ,get a 100 pound sack of dog food or horse food ,or just fill a sack with sand . Ride the bike with the extra weight laying over the passenger seat . Get a little more practice in the parking lot with this extra load . See how the bike responds . It corners a bit different at slow speeds and stops are a bit longer .
 

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Once rolling at highway speeds, a passenger can stand up and dance on the back seat of a 'Wing without you knowing. At 5 mph, if they turn their head, it can put you in the ditch.

Any time I have a new passenger, I instruct them to become part of the machine, stay fairly still and keep their back against the rest so they maintain the same relative lean angle as the bike. That way I'm simply riding a heavier machine.

Now, for the soapbox...my best advice would be to wait until you have some more experience yourself. Your wife probably won't enjoy a ride that ends with a crash. Even if it's just a minor tip over.
 

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I agree with getting comfortable with the bike before you put a passenger on it, but when the time comes, go out to the country somewhere, have your wife follow you in a car. If you can find a parking lot great if not, pick a nice straight road to practice on. Tell who ever you put on the back of the bike that they must remain still, completely still. I wouldn't be to afraid to have a passenger, it's inevitable that your going to have one back there sooner or later.......
 

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Not much I can offer that hasn't been said. First make sure that you are comfortable, then do some short rides with the wife. Back, country roads with little to no traffic is best so you can move along at a spend you feel good with.

Anytime I've gotten a new bike, no one gets a ride for a week. I need time to find the limits, quirks and "personality" of the new ride, and every machine has it's own personality.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
All great advice. I will put some more miles on solo and maybe try the extra weight
on the passenger seat. I haven't taken the safety course yet, next one in September. I ride about 45 miles round trip to work every day and cruise around town in the evenings. I just need to be as patient as my wife. As always, great advice and input. Really helps the less experienced riders. Thanks !!
 

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They should hang on to you and generally stay with the lean of the cycle. In turns, they should look over your shoulder in the direction of the turn. They get on after you so you can stabilize the cycle. They should keep their feet on the pegs or boards. It takes some getting use to, no matter how much single up riding time you have. Start out in a less stressful riding environment. Enjoy.
 

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When taking a new passenger on my 'Wing I always tell them to emulate a bag of potatoes. "Just sit there, don't try to 'help' the bike lean or not lean. Moving a bit or shifting your weight is okay once we're moving on the road but not when the bike is stationary or moving very slow. Sudden moves by a passenger at slow speed is a bad thing, don't do it."
 

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after your practice times in a parking lot alone ,get a 100 pound sack of dog food or horse food ,or just fill a sack with sand . Ride the bike with the extra weight laying over the passenger seat . Get a little more practice in the parking lot with this extra load . See how the bike responds . It corners a bit different at slow speeds and stops are a bit longer .
+1

Or two sacks, or three, or four......

Oh, hell, just put her in a trailer! :ROFL:
 

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All great advise listed above and I will only touch briefly on a slightly "delicate" subject of weight.:ssshh:

Having had both in the passenger seat of the bikes I have had, I can tell you that carrying a heavier passenger is like chalk and cheese from a lighter one.

If a passenger is built like a proverbial " racing snake" you may hardly notice that they are there on the back and if they are good and sit still, then there is very unlikely to be a problem at all. If however a passenger is, how shall I put this..... of a somewhat more robust stature..... then you will notice it more. If they are not experienced as a passenger then they will need to learn to be a passenger, just as you needed to learn to ride the bike. From my experience this is not too hard for them, but you must make it clear that sudden moves in the wrong way may cause you to have a spill, particularly at low speeds.
A passenger must know that they should wait to mount or dismount until such times are you are ready and prepared.

That is about it from me, before I go upsetting anyone not classed as Racing Snakes!! :bow:;)
 

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Get familier and confident with your Wing before adding a passenger. Once a passenger is on back the bike takes on a new set of handling issues. While sitting still or at slow speeds you can feel every move a passenger makes. The Wing will get very heavy and hard to hold up if your passenger is squirming around on the back while stopped or slow speeds. My rule is when I'm slowing down or stopped the passenger is to remain still. Once at highway speeds they can squirm around and reposition without really noticing it. The key is to have a passenger that becomes one with the bike and sits still when not moving at higher speeds.
 

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I rode the wing several months before taking my wife. Make sure to instruct her on how to climb on and off. I think getting off was harder. Also I always make sure she is getting on on the high side and I am ready if we are on an angle. My driveway is really steep.
Good Luck.
 
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