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This made me curious. I keep fuel and maintenance records for all of my vehicles. So the Diva has 851 miles on it since it has been put back on the road. I have fuel consumption records for five tanks. In order the mileage is:
E10= 32.66, 33.22,
E0= 36.97, 35.88 and 34.41
Most of the riding has been on secondary roads. Garmin trip data for Friday's ride is:
101 miles
Moving Average: 41 MPH
Overall Average: 31 MPH
Max Speed: 93 MPH
Moving Time: 2:32 Hr/Min

BTW- the 450 gets around 65MPG
 

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Discussion Starter #22
on my 1800, I also keep a record of every fuel up...

the difference between E0 and E10 was not worth the extra expense of paying for E0.

On my Chevy 2001 Suburban while towing our Toy Hauler, I found that E0 gave a very noticeable increase in Torque and pulled the hills easier than with E10

the extra cost of roughly 45 cents/gallon with a 30 gallon fillup really hurts though.


Tomorrow I having a conference call with two different companies that can reprogram the Suburban's PCM and allow it to make more Torque...

One of them wants $250 to do it, the other hasn't said yet, will get that on the phone I guess.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
http://www.pcmperformance.com/programming.html $250 for a suburban

It looks like it might be possible to rent software from GM (ACDelco) to do the job $55 for 3 days. https://www.acdelcotds.com/acdelco/action/subscribehome

http://www.aa1car.com/library/oemwebsites.htm

PCM is one the one whom emailed me back with the price quote.

Did not know about GM actually renting software at a reasonable price.

Many thanks for that hint.


I think that Rental option would be a good way for me to screw up a good truck.
 

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Thanks for this thread and the replies!

This is a great discussion.

My 1500 has a ridiculous windshield that wraps all the way around the fairing and about 6 inches over my head. It is screwed into the fairing with what looks like a few dozen screws with chrome caps. I've been thinking of taking it off, filling the holes, and getting a normal windshield for the winter and a small windshield for the summer. Right now I rarely get above 32 mpg, even when I set the cruise at 65. If I could make it over 180 miles before the fuel light came on it would be more than worth it; it lights up at 150 miles right now.

A new windshield crossed my mind after my ride to and from Springfield, IL in the nasty weather we had this weekend:
I took my V-Star 1100, because of the increased range, stayed on the Interstate for about 200 miles, but hit reserve consistently at 80-86 miles, while I normally hit it at 160-180+, I got 22 mpg instead of the usual 42+. The rain and wind was so terrible that I had to press my feet into the floorboards to keep them from being blown back. On the return trip, I took back roads with my group and was getting close to 50 mpg at much higher speeds.

With that insane lesson on wind resistance in mind, I'm thinking a smaller windshield could make a huge difference.
 

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This is an interesting and very much overlooked issue, especially related to trike designs. I was at a inventors convention some years ago in Philadelphia and had a discussion with a retired aerospace scientist (long story in itself) at any rate we talked in length about the effects of wind on aircraft and road based vehicles. While most people are being lulled into thinking weight is of paramount importance the real culprit related to economy is air flow not weight. In all my designs airflow is always a dominant consideration as it is very critical to not only efficiency and cooling but also handling. While on that topic high wind screens are definitely a killer when all air flow characteristics are applied. I normally recommend cutting the screens down - on some it seems to be four feet or so (kidding) Goldwings (1500 & 1800) are notorious for difficulties handling wind mainly due to the high location of the faring and windscreen. As far as comparisons to other motorcycles and types one cannot properly compare as there are many other factors the only real and logical comparison would be between a pair of same model/brand motorcycles setup with different accessories like windshield or bug deflectors.
 

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Discussion Starter #30
Bug Deflectors:

yup, got a full set of those things, to keep the engine heat off my legs in summer, or to catch it and warm my legs in Winter.

And we conveniently discount those things when talking about MPG

So, if I remove the windscreen and all of the bug deflectors, my bike ought to get at least 100 mpg :rofl:

in jest of course, but it just might approach the stratosphere that DaveO430 gets with his 1800 all the time.
 

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in jest of course, but it just might approach the stratosphere that DaveO430 gets with his 1800 all the time.
The secret there is not slowing down for the curves. :grin3:
 

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Had this very discussion with my father back a few years. Every time he got a new vehicle I used to ask about his fuel economy. He politely told me that he drove it until it needed gas then he filled it up. He also mentioned that if he couldn't afford the gas, he didn't drive.... snip

Cheers
Your Dad is a smart guy! :smile2:
 

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"Last Saturday, DaveO430 and I with others, rode together, he gets 45 mpg, and my bike produced 32.3 running 80 mph from Oologah to Ft. Smith, and then from Ft. Smith riding twisties it only managed 37.5 mpg while we ran 45 to 65 mph.
Please tell us what are the differences in the bikes were that made for the differences in the mpg. Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #34
Quote:
Originally Posted by AZgl1800
"Last Saturday, DaveO430 and I with others, rode together, he gets 45 mpg, and my bike produced 32.3 running 80 mph from Oologah to Ft. Smith, and then from Ft. Smith riding twisties it only managed 37.5 mpg while we ran 45 to 65 mph.

Please tell us what are the differences in the bikes were that made for the differences in the mpg. Thanks


Mine is an '02 and Dave's is a 2010 if IIRC.
Makes mine a Gen 1, and Dave's is later upgraded version as far as the ECM is concerned.

Mine has an Optic Armor +4 windscreen with a vent.
Dave's has a very short windscreen with side fins on it that make it slightly wider, but still about 2 inches narrower than my windscreen. The height difference is about 10-12 inches..

mine has Baker Air Wings and they were "closed" on that run.... that is, turned in to totally deflect the radiator and oncoming wind away from me.

Dave was the leader on that day's trail ride, so he did not have to make throttle adjustments for speed. And he knows the inside of every corner in Arkansas, he don't slow down.

Me, on the other hand, run slower, and then on the straight aways, I would open the throttle to catch up with him again.

But, my bike consistently is a poor performer as regards MPG...
On long rides with Dave, he gets 44-45 and my bike will give about 32-35
This is for full highway speeds...

here is a screen from Fuelio, an app for my cellphone.


 

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Discussion Starter #35
Here is a Fuel Report in Text Format:

Big Bird
Fuelio Report Tue, 10 Oct 2017,

Period
2017-07-01 – 2017-10-06

Records
Gas: 9

Total costs
$96.12

Total fuel
40.98 gal

Distance
110034 mi - 111147 mi
1113 mi

Fuel consumption
31.71 mpg

Average cost per mile
$0.08
 

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Discussion Starter #38
As you can see, the per tank MPG records are all over the place, which is normal.

Sometimes i am running 85+ into a headwind and pulling a trailer...

Other times, no trailer, and looking at the twisties in Arkansas.
 

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This is an interesting and very much overlooked issue, especially related to trike designs. I was at a inventors convention some years ago in Philadelphia and had a discussion with a retired aerospace scientist (long story in itself) at any rate we talked in length about the effects of wind on aircraft and road based vehicles. While most people are being lulled into thinking weight is of paramount importance the real culprit related to economy is air flow not weight. In all my designs airflow is always a dominant consideration as it is very critical to not only efficiency and cooling but also handling. While on that topic high wind screens are definitely a killer when all air flow characteristics are applied. I normally recommend cutting the screens down - on some it seems to be four feet or so (kidding) Goldwings (1500 & 1800) are notorious for difficulties handling wind mainly due to the high location of the faring and windscreen. As far as comparisons to other motorcycles and types one cannot properly compare as there are many other factors the only real and logical comparison would be between a pair of same model/brand motorcycles setup with different accessories like windshield or bug deflectors.
Airflow does account for drag but you say "not weight". I assume you ride on the flats because weight in the hills and mountains is a major factor.
 

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Yes,, an all day trip at 85 is very tiresome.

Yesterday after visiting with friends, on the way home I set the cruise at 62 because I was pulling the trailer into a headwind.

The time required to get home was only 5 minutes longer than if I had been pushing the speed limit at 70.

Distance was 37 miles. Enjoyed the quiet in my helmet, and watching the traffic jockeying for a better position at least one car further ahead than they were.
One of the downsides I noticed on with me and my late wifes trips is also the wind noise at higher speeds. Besides the 30 -33 mpg once you get around 70 the windnoise just becomes wearing even with helmets on. We would try to stay around 65-70 around here unless it wasnt safe. Im running a Tulsa +4 with windwings and we both always wore helmets. We had one trip where we crossed the Mojave at 80-85 and between the noise and the heat made for a very long day.
If you've never tried the tech, active noise canceling is/can be an amazing thing. I ride with one of the scala rider widgets, but it will output to anything that uses a normal 3.5mm audio jack. I had shoehorned in 40mm headphone drivers into my helmet but found they ate the tiny battery in the scala way too fast. Ordered a pair of noise cancelimg earbuds to use instead.

While they can be overpowered, tested that out this weekend on a bass boat, behind a wind screen and inside a helmet they dramatically reduce sustained noises. They work on things like fan noise, wind, engine noises, traffic noises, air conditioning units, washing machine noise. Stuff like voices, car horns, sirens, music, anything more "abrupt". Is no more muted than normally havimg something stuffed in your ear.

And, you don't have to actually have them plugged into anything to make it work. It's hilarious to stand outside at work and see a harley with loud pipes go by and hear just this faint little putt putt putt. And it's not the same sensation you would get with earplugs. The sounds it cancels are just gone, not muffled.

I liked them so much that the day I got this set, went for a 5 mile loop to test in helmet. Came back in and ordered a second set. Does make getting the helmet on much more of a chore though.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004K09H32/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o03_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
 
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