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I went on a trip with my son's and it was windy. I have a 93 1500 SE how do you control these monsters, is there a trick or have i lost it.



Greg
 

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just keep it up rember there is alot of area for the wind to grab on these monsters
 

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I took my '95 Interstate from Lake Tahoe to San Diego and back last year. Ran into a 30 - 40 mph crosswind for about 150 - 200 miles each way (at 95 to 105 degrees). Felt like I was riding at a 30 degree angle! Wore my tires badly.
Like bilt says, lot of area to grab the bike. One thing I have learned is when conditions are windy....is to read the land topography, look for valleys, hills, etc. that will hide or drive gusts (dust devils, blowing dirt, etc.).
Another thing I did was to install a belly pan. This GREATLY improved aerodynamics under the bike. Cost is about $50 from Tulsa. Click on "price list for part number for the two piece unit. Good luck.

Here is a link:

http://www.allamericanprod.com/tulsabp.html
 

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I have never been so scared on a bike as on my GL1100 in the wind. Normal wind is ok. But I was going over a 2 lane bridge between Maryland and Virginia with the wind howling. It was horrible and really hard to stay in my little tiny lane. Everytime a big truck would go past the other way it would block the wind and make you swerve the other way. So one second you were fighting to keep from going off the bridge, and the next you were trying to stay out of the opposite lane... I won't do that again on a windy day.
 

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Going across I-90 in South Dakota was a real adventure. Constant cross winds the whole way across the state. I try to ride with a very limp posture giving the wind less to grab a hold of. This seems to help, being as loose as possible on the bike. It seems that if you stiffen up your body the wind pushes even more.
 

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Sprdtyf350 wrote:
I have never been so scared on a bike as on my GL1100 in the wind. Normal wind is ok. But I was going over a 2 lane bridge between Maryland and Virginia with the wind howling. It was horrible and really hard to stay in my little tiny lane. Everytime a big truck would go past the other way it would block the wind and make you swerve the other way. So one second you were fighting to keep from going off the bridge, and the next you were trying to stay out of the opposite lane... I won't do that again on a windy day.
Scaredy Cat! :cooldevil:
 

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Bike...and Dennis wrote:
Sprdtyf350 wrote:
I have never been so scared on a bike as on my GL1100 in the wind. Normal wind is ok. But I was going over a 2 lane bridge between Maryland and Virginia with the wind howling. It was horrible and really hard to stay in my little tiny lane. Everytime a big truck would go past the other way it would block the wind and make you swerve the other way. So one second you were fighting to keep from going off the bridge, and the next you were trying to stay out of the opposite lane... I won't do that again on a windy day.
Scaredy Cat! :cooldevil:

 
Yep!! On that day I was definitely a Scaredy Cat!! Those lanes are too narrow to be wobbling around in and those trucks are WAY to big to be hitting head on.. I was really glad to get off that bridge...: I ride over it all the time but that was an eye opener that day..:shock:
 

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To tell the truth if it was that windy I would probably find a rest stop/hotel whatever to wait the wind out. I have the attitude that if I am afraid I am going to get hurt doing something then chances are I will. You have instincts built into you for a reason. Don't ignore them and especially on your bike.
 

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I agree but I never expected it to be like it was. The wind at ground level was no big deal. Just blow you around some. I got up on that bridge and started to climb.... Wow!! It really changed fast and there was no turning back.. Like I said, it was an eye opener. And I look at bridges in a whole different way on windy days.
 

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Seems like you handled it well and gained some good experience the hard way or at least the scarey way:shock:.
 

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Seems like you handled it well and gained some good experience the hard way or at least the scarey way:shock:.
 

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It just takes time and experience to get used to riding in windy conditions. Just take your time, learn how to sense what the bike is doing, and don't over correct, and RELAX! Being tensed up just make it worse. A belly pan definitely helps on the 1500, I had one on my 93, and it made a world of difference in crosswinds.:)



Gene:waving:
 

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Being in the Midwest, we ride in windy conditions a lot of the time. All the good tips have been given - watch the topography and traffic. Be ready for wind blocks that will change the way the bike handles - this includes crops in the fields. Learn the feel of your bike and what it wants to do in wind. Watch bridges and overpasses - the wind will actualy come from the opposite side bouncing off the barriers, or seem to come from a lot of different directions.

Learn to "ride" the bike - the more time you spend on it the more you will develop a natural response to what the bike is doing under you. If you are riding two up have your passenger just sit the ride and go with the flow. Don't need them tensing up and trying to "help" you control the beast beneath.

I've only had one time that my Honey told me she was afraid due to the wind, and that was because we went out on a day that we had no business being out there in the first place. Made a course for home pronto. Use common sense and you should be OK.
 

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This is the 3rd thread where I've heard mention of the belly pans. Do they make them for the 1100, and where do you get them?
 

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...I've ridden my 1500 in very strong crosswinds, both on the leaward side of trucks and on the windward side of trucks.

My experience has been that you want to keep your speed up over 65 mph. I generally run about 75+ on the freeways.

Also, you must ride relaxed in the saddle and allow the bike to lean over. If do that, what you will discover is that your body position will stay in the same track you were in before the wind gust hits you.

By keeping a loose hand grip on the handlebars, you have allowed the bike to swerve slightly moving the tire contact patch away from the wind, but your body position relative to the road will remain the same.

When the wind gust stops, the bike will automatically straighten right up and keep your body position where it is/was.

I have been practicing this procedure for years, and have not been bothered by wind gusts no matter how hard they are.

I made a trip from Mesa, AZ to Tucson and back with crosswind gusts in the 40+ and 50+ mph range according to the weather folks. Sure, I felt them hit the bike, but all it did was to just lean over to counteract for the wind force and it stayed right where it was respective to the road tracking.

IF you try to manhandle it and force it to stay upright and steer against the wind, you are cruising for a real hard bruising, big time.

Relax, learn to let the bike "talk to you". It will, and when you learn the technique, you will be able to just let it have its' head and reward you with a comfortable ride.

Oh, this was on a bike that did NOT have a belly pan. I never felt a need for one.
 

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It's a lot like flying an airplane in turbulence, don't try to hold it too tight, let the bike work with the wind. Over controlling and being tense makes it worse. I've experienced some pretty strong winds in Eastern Washington, Idaho, Wyoming and Nebraska for a few along with some impressive breezes in high mountain passes with my '93 and never had any serious problems. I think it's also a bit like sailing a boat, it feels pretty hairy until you learn to go with the flow and let the boat sail herself for the most part. Guide the bike, don't steer it if you get what a mean and it will be a lot easier. It does get a bit more tiringriding leaning to one side for miles on end and riding with the gusts but it's eminently doable. AZ1500 is right in that the faster you go the more the relative wind over the bike moves forward which causes less leaning. It's the same as when a sailboat picks up speed close hauled eventually the sail luffs because the relative wind moves forward. If you have a 50mph wind right on one side when parked, it will be a 45 degree frontal wind when moving at 50mph.
 

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Thanks you everyone I will try the belly pan i heard a lot about them. But again thanks for all of the info.
 

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One of the scariest rides for me was the Astoria Bridge last August especially after riding close to sea level and then riding up to the 200 ft level. It was really windy on the bridge that day but not so bad on the return trip. Using speed to get out of trouble usually works but not in this case. I have been riding bikes for 35 years+ and I admit to certain queasiness where heights are concerned.

What will the roads to Colorado be like I wonder. There's nothing like getting the wind up you, to know you are living!


http://www.google.com/search?q=ASTO...crosoft:en-US:&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&sourceid=ie7

Some really interesting bridges around the world:
http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl...ridges+in+england&ndsp=20&hl=en&sa=N&start=20
 

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They close the Confederation bridge when the wind is to high to high sided trucks, buses and campers, then bikes, then if it is really high all traffic. I miss the boats ;(

James
 
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