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went to change oil&filter,started bike to let it warm up now it is about 30 out side.let bike warm up noticed drops of water out the exhaust pipes.for very short time.is that condinsation.checked rad.and over flow both right on mark.no water in oil,plugs look good,do i need to look somewhere else.or keep rideing till it snows?????
 

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Others will know better than me, but I would think it is just condensation. I've noticed the same thing when warming up my bikes in cold weather.

Chuck
 

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Keep riding till the snow flies.
 

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You will get condensation till the motor gets up to operating temperature so the best thing to do is not start it up and run it for a couple minutes at a time. Run it until you get the moisture out of the mufflers or they will rust out prematurely. I always kept the gas tank full when I lived in Iowa in the winter or you will have rust problems there too. Ride it all you can, Goldwing's don't like to sit for long!
 

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cant ride this week end.shot gun deer season would rather take a beating then miss that!!!!!!also what is in rotella 15- 45 changed it today could tell it done wonders bike seems to run smoother.dont know if it makes a difference but tack quite jumping around?????
 

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What I know about condensation (not alot) it seems to me it collects in the exhaust as the exhaust is cooling, or maybe while it heating up. At least that's my guess whats happening because when I run my work truck every day, in the morning it blows steam for the first couple miles til the condensation dries out. I dont drive it on the weekend so on Monday I noticed it doesnt blow steam.
So doesnt it make sense that by warming up the Goldwing occasionally that this is actually contributing to creating the condensation which is rotting out the exhaust?

Maybe it would be better to not start it when in storage, rather crank it over in short bursts every few weeks just to get oil moved around.
 

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You are right Dan, the condensation happens when it's cooling off. You are also probably right about not starting it for short periods during storage. If you run it long enough to burn out the moisture it's just going to condense again when it cools down.
 

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Condensation 101

All my life I have waited for the opportunity to write this, not!

When gasoline burns the two main byproducts are water and carbon dioxide, plus small amounts of carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides and some other minor stuff.

I didn't look up the exact details, but if you burn a gallon of gasoline, you get close to a gallon of water, believe it or not.

When it is cold, the exhaust system is cold, and so some of this water will condense inside the exhaust system. The rest blows out the back and makes the plume of steam you see on a cold day.

As the exhaust warms up, the trapped water will eventually evaporate, drying out the mufflers and stuff. Once it is warm the gas exiting the muffler is hotter and disperses more effectively, so that the plume of steam is less noticeable. Except if you live in very cold climes like Winterpeg it never goes away!

When you shut down, the exhaust is much hotter than the environment, so there is no condensation, and most of the residual water on shutdown will evaporate, but probably not all.

The situation in gas tanks is different, and the key element here is free air volume over the gas. If it is filled right up, no air, no issue.

If there is air in the tank it will warm and cool with changing weather and day/night temperature changes.

As it warms it expands and some leaves the tank, as it cools it contracts and sucks in air from the surroundings. The air sucked in will have moisture in it, if it gets cool enough it will condense and sink to the bottom of the tank, and there it will stay. This cycle repeats itself interminably, until you have a big slug of water in the tank.

This same cycle also happens with the engine, not as severely because the mass of the engine components slows down the warming/cooling cycle. Nevertheless, some water still collects, so you must change the oil in the spring, or else run it periodically hot enough to dry it out.

All those who dozed off may now wake up:cheeky1:
 

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So Bob, it kinda seems to me it's a trade off whether to allow the accumulated moisture to sit in the engine by not running it or to run it and accumulate moisture in the exhaust.

Accumulated moisture on the internals is certainly doing more costly damage.

Since oil and water dont mix, wouldn't it be better to not run it, rather crank it to coat the internals with oil to displace the water from those parts?

I'm curious about this because there seems to be alot more 1000's and 1100's with rotted exhausts than there are with rusted innards.
 

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The thing is, if you run it long enough that the exhaust gets properly warmed up then you will dry out both engine and exhaust. I'm not suggesting that an exhaust would last forever if always warmed right up, it's a wicked environment for steel. But, they will last longer if carefully treated. If any 30 yo bike still has an original exhaust then it has done very well.

As somebody said earlier, the worst thing to do is run it a short while, that way the water accumulates in the exhaust and doesn't get evaporated.

I don't think water in the engine is a big deal if the oil is changed out before putting the bike away, to get rid of corrosive stuff. I am a believer in spraying the inside of the cylinders with oil before storage, the rest of the engine is well enough oiled that water over one winter season is not a problem. If you change it out in the spring then it isn't a lubrication problem either.
 
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