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This is my 1st year with a water cooled bike of any sort and my 1st Goldwing ('99 SE). What is the drill for winter storage. I'm in upstate NY where we get lots of snow and January/February gets several days below zero. I'll be storing it in a small unheated barn/shed.

I'm guessing stabilizer in the gas tank andbring the battery insidebut, what about the cooling system? Do I need to turn the fuel line off (can you do that?) and run the carbs dry? Do you leave it on the center stand or do something to get both tires off the ground?

Appreciate any advice on this. I'm hoping to ride for a few more weeks but unfortunately, it's almost time to put her to bed for the winter.

~Jim
 

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Send it my way for the winter!:cool::cool:You want have to go through all the trouble:cooldevil::cooldevil:
 

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nightwizard40 wrote:
Send it my way for the winter!:cool::cool:You want have to go through all the trouble:cooldevil::cooldevil:
Just break down and buy a 1500, you cheap rascal!:cooldevil:
 

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My advice would be to move to where you can enjoy riding year round. :D

I can't imagine having to park my bikes because of weather. Oh yea, just remembered, when it rains, which is a few times a year. I'm a wuss.:(


All in fun, of course.
 

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We have a longer riding season in VA as opposed to NY. I park my bike at the storage facility, and ...
  • Clean the bike
  • Fill up the gas tank
  • Put in fuel stabilizer
  • Park the bike on the center stand
  • Disconnect the battery
  • Wait for the snow and ice to pass
I've never had an issue so far. If I were in an area with a shorter riding season I would winterize per the proverbial book. In other words, I would take out the spark plugs, poor in a tablespoon of oil into each cylinder, put the plugs back in and then remove the battery to a warmer spot. Keeping the battery on a trickle charger is a good idea if you remove it for a long period. Finally, cover the bike to keep dust off and keep it pretty for that first day of riding again.
 

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I'd like to add a word of caution here, when we say trickle charger it must be one designed to maintain battery condition long term, Optimate, Battery Tender or something like that. A typical 'trickle charger' will harm the battery if used for too long.

I am a firm believer in putting lube in the cylinders, but I use Mercury Marine storage seal, it kind of fogs and foams and sticks. I've used it for 25 years and have faith in it.

You must get both tires off the ground. I use inverted T's made of scrap 2x4 with a notch that the end of the fork sits in. I also tie the bars so the front wheel doesn't turn. That's the last thing I do before putting the cover on in Nov and wishing it goodbye until March.

If you have rodents, plug the ends of the mufflers and put a few mothballs on the ground under the bike, you won't regret it!
 

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Hi Jim. where i live in Canada it gets real cold around Dec. Jan Feb and March so there's not much riding going on up here first thing i do is change the oil and drain the oil filter reinstall the filter. this way i get rid of any acids or crap and corruption in the oil. next i check the anti freeze for the right specs for the climate that you are in a 50/50 mix is usually pretty good mix. one note that i got from a Honda dealer was to use a SILICATE free and ALUMINUM compatible anti freeze.. not all anti freezes are the same the reason for the silicate free anti freeze was the silicate anti freeze will wear out your water pump bushing prematurely. hope this helps.
 

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I'm with English Bob as I also like to fog the engine to lube the cylinders.On 2-stoke engines it also coats the crankshaft bearings.I fog everything I own if it is going to sit for any length of time.Helps keep condensation from rusting the cylinder walls.
 

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In addition to the oil and filter change, don't forget to fill the gas tank. If it is full then you won't have air in there which will lead to rust. I put stabilizer in the tank and let it run through the carbs. I remove the plugs and squirt some oil in each cylinder. I then turn the motor over with the kill switch off and the plugs out, just to spread the oil around.

Remove the battery and take it inside. I normally leave the coolant alone.

This year, I plan to stuff something into the two intakes on the air box to stop any furry critters setting up home in there around my nice new air filter. I just hope I remember to pull it out before I fire her up in the spring.

Finally, I rub down the chrome and paintwork and anything else that gets in the way with liquid wax polish and leave it on as a protective coat for the winter. In the spring I polish it off.
 

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Fill her up - add fuel stabilizer - pull her into your heated garage and put it on the center stand. 3/4 ply under the front wheel - battery tender - start it once a week and let her run for 10 minutes or so.
:jumper:
 
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