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hi..any tips on storing bike for winter..... i have my bike in locked garage for winter i go in and start her up weekly.. i do not cover her up as people have said itn will collect condensation... but when i go in there.. there is a slight dampness on the bike.. should in just wipe her down weekly and leave it at that.... any help would be great..... regards..jim :waving::waving:1986 1200 interstate..:12red::12red:
 

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For starters STOP running the engine weekly. Worse thing you can do. It will cause large amounts of condensation to collect in the exhaust and it will rust from the inside out. That could be where some of the moisture inside the garage is coming from. Any heat you can have in there will stop that. Even raise the temp only a few degrees...
 

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Hi Jim. I going to guess for the most part you will see damp conditions & not much freezing. Your tank must be full & have a good fuel stabilizer in it. you should shut off your fuel & allow your carbs to run dry, Or run your wing until you are sure that the stabilizer is in the float bowls.

Light wipe of oil on your fork tubes as well as other metal parts that might rust. Tires off the ground & at max inflation, 40 psi front & rear. if you want to cover the bike, thats o.k. but the cover must be tented over the bike so it is not in direct contact. You must have air movement to allow moisture to escape. Clean oil in the engine because old oil will have acids in it which will burn bearing area's. You can pull the battery or leave it in place with the ground off the battery to electronically disengage it from the bike. A trickle charger or battery tender on the battery to keep it topped up. If the battery is acid type, keep your eye on the fluid level & top off with distilled water only. I give my leather a good dose of dubbin or other treatment to keep it supple. pull your plugs out & squirt some oil into the cylinders. than roll it over briefly to coat the walls. replace plugs, give it a big hug & close the door behind you!!!
 

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Hatchetman, You stated something that caughtmy attention and I'd like a little more info on. Why does the cover need to be tented? I have a regular cover with the gathers o the bottom on mine, it's not tented. Not debating you, just want to know if I'm doing something wrong and why.
 

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I'm not trying to start anything either,but I don't quite agree with the oil down the cylinders because of the flat-4 or 6 design of the engine.I don't see how that will coat the top of the cylinder.IMHO you are better to spray storage oil into the carbs and that will coat everything.And it's easier to do than pulling the plugs(unless you own an 1800).Another thing that I do with my bike and my snowmobile is to spray all your chrome and metal parts with WD-40.It will leave a fine coat of oil on everything,stops condensation and is easy to wash off 6 months later.It won't hurt the paint either.
 

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I always spray oil in the cylinders, but I use Mercury marine Storage Seal. Using the little red tube I angle it up to top of the cylinder, same as on most outboards. the stuff foams up enough that I believe it does a good job of coating the walls.

I also don't think it is critical to coat the top of the cylinder, the oil will end up in the same place as the water, so provided it gets there first.........
 

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Tenting your cover is just a good rule as some people use bike covers where others might use a tarp. If you have a material that breaths, moisture is not likely to become trapped. If you dont have a material that breaths than moisture can sit on your bike for the duration that it is covered which allows corrosion to begin.

If air can move around your bike than moisture can evaporate, leaving your bike dry.
 

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Im luckey,I keep mine in a heated shop so I can piddle with it anytime. Dont want to think about leaving it in the cold!
 

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If you store the bike indoors it's best to use a dust cover that's not water tight. All you want is to keep the dust off it. An impervious cover with no vent will collect moisture since water vapor is lighter than air and will rise and be trapped against the top of the cover on the inside. If you have to store outside, it's important that your cover has vents at the highest points to allow water vapor to escape.
 

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If the condensation is bad enough to make the bike damp you can put a light bulb, even 15 watts, under the bike with the cover on it. That bulb will generate enough heat to drive moisture away from the bike. That bulb will also generate enough heat to attract animals so you need to take some very firm anti-mouse steps.
 

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Piddling, is what my wife tells my dog to do when she lets her out in the morning.As far as storage goes, I use mine thruout the winter and when its not being used it sits in my unheated garage. Uncovered untreated gas and all.So when it turn comes around to start it does without incident. these old bikes were meant to be able to run hard and to be idle for a while without the need of special care.Now if your talking a year or more of being idle,then you'll need to fog the cylinders, treat the gas or drain it and coat the tank,throw a battery tender on it and maybe raise the wheels off the ground.And if you have a good coat of wax on the bike ,the condensation will have no more effect then riding in the rain.,,
 

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The fogging oil doesn't puddle to the bottom it leaves a coating on everything.I put a bigger motor in my snowmobile a few years back,but I had fogged the old one before I took it out.A couple of years later a buddy of mine wanted to buy it so I said I would check it out to see if was OK.I had sealed the intake and exhaust ports when I stored it.On that type of 2-stroke you can see both sides of the cylinder by looking in the ports.The cylinders were totally coated with a thick coating.On a 2-stroke also it coats the crank and rod bearings.Big failure spot on these motors if not done right.My point is that the rust in the cylinders isn't going to limit itself to the bottom of the cylinders where normal oil will end up puddling so I would sooner fog it and make sure everything is coated.And it's easy to do except on the 1800 because of the air filter location.
 

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I have to sit with creekwalker, any day it's warm enough and the roads are dry, I'm outta here.
 

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But.......... What if you store your wing on a rotissary:baffled:???

No oil will pool than eh!:cheeky1:
 

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I agree with the "nix" on the stationary running stratagemandhighly recommend the use of the Deltran Battery Tender. One can be purchased for as little as 20 bucks (US) when you shop for it but even @ 15% more it's worth the investment because of the ease with which it can be employed on so many other applications.

Deltran markets their units with installable wiring plugs for the battery (and you can buy additional ones separately) that are connectable to the Tender the right way every time [even a CaveMan can do it!] The unit is "intelligent" and moniters the charge of the battery constantly without "cooking" it!

On a separate tack the concerns about condensation are VERY REAL inside the fuel tank! The design of the ol' FCW tank is flawed in that the seam of tank's two halves is vertical andloses it's corrosion treatment duringassembly.Because water is heavier than fuel {and the seam is at the lowest point of the tanks design} there is little that can be done to mitigate corrosion over time.

So always store the bike with as much stabilized fuel as you can! And moniter the lower back section of the tank [behind the rear brake M/C and/or the battery]; when corrosion begins to penetrate to metal it will do so in pinholes that seep at the seam. On the outside of the tank it will first appear as a waxy film that captures road dust and has the odor of old stale varnish.
 

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bikeknight52 wrote:
I agree with the "nix" on the stationary running stratagemandhighly recommend the use of the Deltran Battery Tender. One can be purchased for as little as 20 bucks (US) when you shop for it but even @ 15% more it's worth the investment because of the ease with which it can be employed on so many other applications.

Deltran markets their units with installable wiring plugs for the battery (and you can buy additional ones separately) that are connectable to the Tender the right way every time [even a CaveMan can do it!] The unit is "intelligent" and moniters the charge of the battery constantly without "cooking" it!

On a separate tack the concerns about condensation are VERY REAL inside the fuel tank! The design of the ol' FCW tank is flawed in that the seam of tank's two halves is vertical andloses it's corrosion treatment duringassembly.Because water is heavier than fuel {and the seam is at the lowest point of the tanks design} there is little that can be done to mitigate corrosion over time.

So always store the bike with as much stabilized fuel as you can! And moniter the lower back section of the tank [behind the rear brake M/C and/or the battery]; when corrosion begins to penetrate to metal it will do so in pinholes that seep at the seam. On the outside of the tank it will first appear as a waxy film that captures road dust and has the odor of old stale varnish.
hi..thanks for your replies.. last week when i started her up she ticked over ok..i left bike running for 10 minutes then revved her up a little..and she missed a bit like firing on 3 cylinders so let her tick over another 5 minutes the revved again and she was as sweet as a nut.. this bike has never done that before.. sayingthat i have never left her standing before.. i last rode her 2 months ago.. so on monday i will fill her up and add some fuel stabilizer.. the bike had oil change 1000 mile ago and is still clean.. i will be riding her again in march 2009.. as putting oil down spark plug holes nether done this before not mechanacly minded,,,, will bike be ok if i dont do this... the bike always starts first time and is in great condition... any further comments will be great... kind regards..jim :waving::12red::12red:
 

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Sandman, i think you got plenty of good advice and probably will figure out what is best for your situation. But boy are these guys tough on piddlers or what? Sure is a great forum!!!!
 
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