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I am storing my bike in a newly built outdoor unheated shed. I live in Oakville, Ontario Canada (cold) and I would appreciate any advice on how to winterize my bike before I put it away. Do I have to drain the carbs? ( how do you do that). I know that I should:
1. Change the oil.
2. Put fuel stabilizer in full tank.
3. Remove battery
Have I missed anything?

Thanks,
Tom
 

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1. Yes, 2. yes, 3. I never do. Place bike on center stand, and hook up to a Battery Tender. Check anti freeze to be sure it is good for your climate.
Tom Bishop
 

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I would not leave battery out in freezinf weather over winter. take it in someplace warm and chargeit now and then or have it on tender.
wilf
 

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Move South??

;)

Stabil or Seafoam work well for fuel stabilization.

In absence of a battery-tender, just remove it and store it somewhere out of the wife's way in the house.
 

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I don`t drain the carbs either. I suppose you could though by disconnecting the vacuum hose to the vacuum fuel shut off valve, plugging end, and letting it run till it dies. If you have a Mity Vac you could put a vacuum on the fuel shut off valve for a few minutes with the key on next spring. A charged battery isn`t going to freeze. I leave it in and hook it up to a battery tender. 38 years worth now. Current battery is 6 years old /with 110,000 miles on it.
Tom Bishop
 

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rgbeard wrote:
Move South??

;)

Stabil or Seafoam work well for fuel stabilization.

In absence of a battery-tender, just remove it and store it somewhere out of the wife's way in the house.
Ohhh, out of the wife's way,,,,,This could be the part I am doing wrong:thumbsup:
It might explain the bike noises, of should I say the noise about the bike I am hearing over the winter.
 

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gumbyred wrote:
I don`t drain the carbs either. I suppose you could though by disconnecting the vacuum hose to the vacuum fuel shut off valve, plugging end, and letting it run till it dies. If you have a Mity Vac you could put a vacuum on the fuel shut off valve for a few minutes with the key on next spring. A charged battery isn`t going to freeze. I leave it in and hook it up to a battery tender. 38 years worth now. Current battery is 6 years old /with 110,000 miles on it.
Tom Bishop
I was told that turning off the petcock and running till she dies would be a sufficient drain for winter storage...Is that not true?

Granted, Massachusetts doesn't get as cold as Ontario Canada, so what works for me might not work for tommyrich....
 

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The marine formula sta-bil is supposed to be the best. Make sure you ride some so it will mix and get into the carbs. Top the tank off to prevent rust in the tank. I generally store my bike for a few weeks during the worst part of the winter. :smiler:
 

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WARNING!!!! NEVER EVER use a shop vac for gasoline!!!!!!! I sucked up some W-D 40 once, and I thought the shop was gonna burn down!!! The arcing brushes of the vac ignited the alcohol in the W-D40!!!!! Just trying to save a life here!!! jimsjinx (ret. fireman)
 

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jimsjinx wrote:
The arcing brushes of the vac ignited the alcohol in the W-D40!!!!! Just trying to save a life here!!! jimsjinx (ret. fireman)
A retired fireman learned this by DOING it HIMSELF! .............doesn't it 'jes figure!

T. (ret. paramedic - please don't ask what I"VE learned the hard way!)
 

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jimsjinx wrote:
WARNING!!!! NEVER EVER use a shop vac for gasoline!!!!!!! I sucked up some W-D 40 once, and I thought the shop was gonna burn down!!! The arcing brushes of the vac ignited the alcohol in the W-D40!!!!! Just trying to save a life here!!! jimsjinx (ret. fireman)
OMG - Never thought of that - Thanks.

I can't say I can think of that coming up - but - wow.

You might'a saved me.
 

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RckRagman wrote:
gumbyred wrote:
I don`t drain the carbs either. I suppose you could though by disconnecting the vacuum hose to the vacuum fuel shut off valve, plugging end, and letting it run till it dies. If you have a Mity Vac you could put a vacuum on the fuel shut off valve for a few minutes with the key on next spring. A charged battery isn`t going to freeze. I leave it in and hook it up to a battery tender. 38 years worth now. Current battery is 6 years old /with 110,000 miles on it.
Tom Bishop
I was told that turning off the petcock and running till she dies would be a sufficient drain for winter storage...Is that not true?

Granted, Massachusetts doesn't get as cold as Ontario Canada, so what works for me might not work for tommyrich....
There are 2 schools of thought on this one as far as I know. If you drain the carbs you avoid varnishing, but you expose some seals to the air which may dry them out over the months of storage.

If you don't drain the carbs it helps keep the seals soft, but the gas will eventually evaporate leaving the seals in the open and varnish the carbs. The theory here is this seals are exposed for a shorter time period.(And in my part of Canada a bike can be stored for 5 or 6 months, so every little bit helps)
And if you run the first couple of tanks of fuel with Seafoam in the spring it will do a pretty good job of getting the varnish out.

I do option 2 have been for years with no problems (Yet) I always put plastic under the bike, change oil and filter, balance the bike on the center stand to get both wheels off the ground, empty the rear shocks, take the battery indoors and cover it with a ventilated cover in a non heated space. And oh ya, in the last 5 or 6 yr. using dryer sheets in the muffler ends saddle bags, under the seat and a few other places to keep the mice out.

I am not saying this is the be all and only way to store a bike, I have been doing it this way for about 34 years with different bikes and never had a problem.

Good luck and may the force be with you. Or may the Schwartz be wit you. :thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup: Depending on which movie you like best.
 

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Oil and filter change, stabilizer in the tank. Run it for a while to get the stabilizer into the carbs. Take out the battery and store it indoors. Give it a charge now and again through the winter.

Last year, I left the battery in my 1100 over the winter. I made sure it was fully charged. In the spring,I needed a new battery. It was two years old.

I still have the battery in my 1500. I live in hope that there will stillbe days warm enough to take her for a ride. As soon as the snow flies, that battery is coming out and is going to spend the winter in my basement.
 

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I aggree with all the above, change the oil, stabil in the tank & run it through the carbs, a battery maintainer, plus it's a good time to lubricate all your cables including the speedo cable!
 

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When I lived in Montana I would change oil, put Stabil in and run it a few minutes. Used a Battery Tender. I'd also mention leave the bike sit, don't start it until you are ready for the riding season.
 

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For years, I used to drain the carbs on my bikes. Now, to save time and maintenance efforts, I use fuel stabilizer and run the engine for a good ten minutes or go for a ride is even better. (Might be too late for that where you’re at!!!) That has worked really well for me; I also fill the gas tank right up to prevent condensation and rust. As for the battery, assuming it’s in very good condition, it will not freeze as long as it is fully charged and disconnected. However, my experience with batteries (and the -30C temperatures) has convinced me to remove it and store it in a cool dry place with periodic charging or hook it up to a battery tender.

Changing the oil is always a good idea but you might want to consider changing it again in the spring if your bike sits for 4 to 6 months! I personally leave the oil change to spring and I don’t run the engine until that’s done.

If you are to cover the bike, make sure it’s with breathable material so you don’t get condensation, especially with the humidity level and temperature changes in Ontario.

Plugging all orifices with dryer sheets or rags is a great idea. I once had a large mouse nest in the air filter of my ’83 CB1100F. Luckily I checked it before the first start of the spring.





Cheers and happy hibernation!!
 
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