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There are several ways to check the stator windings. Personally I'd use an ohm meter and an AC voltmeter. All three windings are grounded on one end so they allshould have the same resistance to ground, and the resistance between any two should have twice the resistance of any one lead to ground. If any leads are open to ground then the thing is fried for sure. You can fire up the bike and measure the output voltage of each winding also. This is going to be AC voltage at this point since it's ahead of the rectifier. Don't worry about exactly what the voltage is, mainly the idea is to see if all three windings are putting out the same voltage. It is important to do it while the bike is idling since changes in RPM will change the output voltages. If one of the coils has some windings shorted together it might not show up clearly with an ohmmeter but the AC voltage check should discern the difference.

A meter capable of reading inductance (Henrys) would also be another way to do it. An Oscilloscope would do it too, but mostof us don't have these on hand. You can get a cheap digital voltmeter at Harbor Freight for less than $5.00 which will do nicely for both measurements.

:waving::waving:
 

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Silicon Sam wrote:
They aren't in a true parallel, but sorta. Think of a triangle and the three lines are the stator coils, and the 3 points of the triangle are your yellow wires. Each yellow wire is connected to 2 coils.

Raymond
Close, but no cigar. What you are describing is a DELTA connection, the stator is setup as a WYE. In the WYE one end of each winding is connected to a neutral or in this case a ground. In a DELTA none of the windings is grounded. The three windings generate AC voltages 120 degrees out of phase with each other and are fed to the rectifier to be converted to DC and then to the regulator to limit the output voltage to the nominal 14V.
 

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Dave Campbell wrote:
A cheap digital voltmeter cannot read stator voltage, the frequency of the stator signal is too high (and varies), and DVMs are designed to read a symmetrical sine wave, the stator voltage is not a symmetrical sine wave. Readings are not accurate.
A cheap digital voltmeter read a voltage, it won't be accurately calibrated due to waveshape and frequency, but it WILL be off the same amount on all three windings which gives a valid comparative reading. The exact voltage is not all that necessary to ascertain, any significant difference between the output of the three coils is all you need from a mechaic's viewpoint.
 
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