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I have an 85 1200 Aspencade. I went out for my first ride of the spring today and it ran great. I drove about 10 miles to Wal Marts, and parked the bike for about 30 minutes. When I went to start it It didn't crank. No relay click or anything. I pushed the start button 3 times and then it started like normal. I drove it another 8 miles, parked it for about 10 minutes. When I came out of the store the same problem. I had to push start it to get home. When I pulled it into the garage I turned it off and then tried to restart it and the same problem, it wouldn't crank. I let the bike cool off for a couple of hours and it started like a new one. The temperature outside was about 80 degrees. I have dirven the bike in 50 degree temps with no problem starting. Does anyone have any idea why it doesn't crank when it gets warmed up?
 

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Some problems like a dirty start button switch can cause this but there are others that are very comman.

You must check your battery for proper voltage. Non running it should be high 12's or low 13's.

Bike running at idle should show just over 13 volts. at 2500 to 3000 rpm you should see 13.8 to 14 volts.

Your starter might be getting old & the brushes are most likely worn down. while cranking, your battery voltage should not drop before 10 volts. If it does, your battery could be weak or your starter is drawing way too much power because it's tired!

Dirty or loose connections on your main power wires from the battery to the relay & down to the solonoid will cause high resistance & add to your problems as well.
 

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No problem with voltage and battery. This only happens when the engine gets warmed up and runs for 20 to 30 minutes in moderate traffic (30 to 45mph). After the bike cools down it starts perfectly. When I push the start button the headlight turns off but nothing else happens. I checked the start switch and the clutch switch and they are ok. It seems to be a heat related problem and I'm not sure where to start looking.
 

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I have a 1980 gl1100 had tha same problem. Pulled starter what a mess nothing but carbon in tha nose. Put new one on it problem solved. at the same time i replaced 29 year old starter relay.starts like a brand new bike. good luck.
 

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It does sound like a realy fouled starter,(carbon dust from the brushes), binding the windings that are heat expanded. You might get by with a good cleaning.



But along the line of Hatchetman's response, your battery has to be up to snuff. 8 > 10 mile rides might not be long enough to fully recharge the battery, especially if your riding inlow rpm in stop and go traffic. :gunhead:
 

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yup. battery may not be up to cranking and may not be charging that well. Mine did the same. Had the starter rebuilt and with new battery have no further problems.
 

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I would go for the starting motor. Its known as a lazy starting motor, when it gets warm and with age it wont restart the bike until it cools down. It has happened to me with cars and bikes.
Refurbish or replace...happy motoring
 

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2 cents worth. If that starter button is really good. (did you clean contacts?), then it could be solenoid. Clean contacts or turn them over and use other side (inside solenoid) to see if helps before buying starter.
 

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I'll check the solenoid. Went out riding this morning taking the same route and same speed as before when the problem started. It was about 60 degrees when I left and returned. No problems starting. I went out this afternoon and it would not start again. The temperature was 78. After sitting for about 20 minutes it started with no problems. The next time I go out I am going to take a volt meter with me and check the solenoid. I'll let you know what I find out. Thanks for all of the suggestions.
 

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Good morning all.

I had the same problem. Although mine is a GL1100 so I don't know if the starters are the same. Basically what was happening was when the starter warmed up from the engine heat the nose on the starter expanded from the heat. The brush mounting plate inside the nose lost contact with the starter nose and casing resulting in no electrical flow.
This is a design issue with the 1100s . I am not sure if the 1200 has the same design issue. I read in later years that Honda included a ground wire from the brush mounting plate to the starter body to resolve the issue.
I fixed mine myself by cleaning the starter. There are a few friction tabs on the brush mounting plate that had to be realigned to make constant contact with the starter casing and nose.
Recommend you check your starter design. You should be able to do that on line at a motorcycle parts webpage or down loading the parts manual for your model.
Doing the job yourself take a little time but it is not difficult. If you try it take your time and make a note of how parts come off so you get them back on the same way. Take pictures if you have to at each step.

Good Luck if you attempt it.

Brian
 

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Heres the latest update. I started to check the starter solenoid and as I was trying to pull it away from the side of the battery I heard a snap. It sounded like the connector locked in all of the way. I have been riding it for 3 days now and I haven't had any problems starting it. It's possible that it has been this way for quite a while and finally decided to loose connection. I appreciate all of the help in what to look for. I hope this helps someone in the future. It sure was a lot easier than pulling the starter apart.
 

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I still think you should take the solenoid apart and make sure that snap was not a post breaking inside. Mine was easy to take apart.
 
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