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Discussion Starter #1
Okay, I need opinions.

I am thinking of putting this cooler on the tongue of my trailer. It would contain a large deep cycle 12vdc battery, and two gallons of gasoline in either two or four containers.

I know ... "Joe! The SPARKS will blow you up!" Well, there will not BE any sparks. I want a clean way to carry extra gasoline ONLY while in the remote areas of Canada and along the road to Alaska, so I don't run out of fuel.

I really like the insulated stainless steel containers, and the cooler itself would be insulated, so heat would not be a problem. However, I have purchased one smaller stainless container and will test it for resilience to gasoline. The plastic cap seems to be high quality, but if gasoline eats at the seal, it will NOT work.

The other option is the more ugly and clunky separate battery box, with the gasoline containers on a rack on either side, and all three items exposed to prying eyes and dirt, bugs, rocks, etc. I am not excited about this option, because gas containers and battery boxes attract THIEVES, but a cooler is less of a target for thieves.

Here are the photos. Your votes count!





 

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1st off, those gas containers you have are not Vapor Proof.
I bought a 2 gallon Plastic Jerry Can that has a single Cap that tightens, and is Vapor Proof.... it does NOT have that ugly, useless spout on it.


I carry a Poly Ice Chest on my trailer's front platform.
( for me, it is used for ice/water mix for my Phase Change cooling vest)


My trailer is a wooden box with a "tongue" sticking further about 24 inches.... that is where the ice chest and spare stuff sits.


I would place the battery on the "shelf" or "rack" in front of the trailer, and use a standard Battery Hold down clamp available from auto stores to keep it in place. at the base of the battery should be a ridge/Angle Iron/Wood Strip that will prevent the battery from shifting horizontally. The Battery Hold down had two bolts on it, big long J-Bolts go down past the battery and thru the bottom of the shelf/bracket. Just like in your car.


Battery Boxes, if they fit tight enough, will provide additional protection from flying granite knives kicked up by the bike's tires. IF, there is any room at all for things to shift, it will, that is a given because of the severe terrain you will be traveling over.


I would also get a Solar Panel and Charge Regulator to keep those batteries topped off while traveling. I bought one last month, it puts out 10 amps max, and is just about the size of the top of a motorcycle trailer.


https://www.aimscorp.net/120-watt-portable-foldable-solar-panel-monocrystalline.html


The solar panels are packaged into a canvas folding "briefcase" that protects them while not in use. it is dark outside, I will take some pictures tomorrow to show it to you.


the neat thing about the Solar Panel is that while you are stopped and working out of a basecamp, it can keep your batteries in good health. I'm not sure about keeping them from being stolen, you will have to be inventive there.


there is a separate small package that contains the Charge Regulator. I have that with the package.


That solar panel can kick ass, when it was shipped, they crimped on two spade lug terminals and just stuffed them into the ouside pockets to keep them tidy.....
el wrongo!!!


I did not know that, and unfurled the panels on a cloudy day, and the terminals melted right off.... like in about 5 seconds!!! we quickly folded it back up, and then pursued the problem ( chase the good smoke ) and found the melted terminals. we replaced them with a Battery Tender brand, two wire battery connector. end of problem. like I said, pictures tmw.


Speaking of tires. I would highly suggest you put a RF ZP tire on the back, it will provide much better service in Alaska than a m/c tire. Especially pulling a trailer. I pulled my trailer over 4,000 miles "on pavement" and the tire still had the little nipples on the tread when I got home.
 

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my Jerry can holds 2 gallons, and rides in the right side Saddle bag, to the rear, out of sight.

it fits snugly, and I have never, ever, smelled any fumes when the saddle bag door is opened. that is where I store my Frogg Toggs and bike covers, makes for nice fluffy stuffing to hold that can tight.


it has been there for 3 years now, never been opened, and no fumes.
I left two inches of room at the top for expansion in warm weather.


for you? I would recommend two 2 gallon cans.
two riders who went to Alaska have reported on here, that 2 gallons is not enough, they ran out before the next fuel stop. which involved someone else going after fuel.
 

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I wouldn't have a problem carrying fuel and a battery together but that cooler is an inefficient design for that. Get a metal or plastic lockable box you can bolt in place.
 

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Damn, that's a lot of weight on the back of a Goldwing hitch.
Put some heavy stuff in the Back of the trailer to offset it!
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Damn, that's a lot of weight on the back of a Goldwing hitch.
I have been thinking of putting the battery INSIDE the Escapade trailer, at the rear center, and behind the axle. That will put the battery's weight in a position to lift weight OFF of the tongue.

I am trying to avoid loosing the interior length though, because my tent is long when folded. It is a tent from REI. It is 10x10 when set up, and over six feet tall inside. I am beyond the age of crawling into tents on my knees. The tent is an "instant set up" model that one man can set up in about two minutes. It is a really nice tent, but at the cost of being about the size of a long narrow gun case when folded.

I will have to work out the logistics today. I am alo considering having a friend in CommieFornia make a top box for me. I have run out of time to do it here. The top box, made out of aluminum, would be for the bulky stuff that I may not need to access on a regular basis. The rain suit and boots, spare helmet, gloves, and such. He has the same CNC plasma table that I have, but he is FAR more talented than I am at welding aluminum, so we are discussing a design for a box about 28" wide x 32-38" long, with a rounded nose and a rear shape that follows the contour of the rear wing on the lid of the trailer. It would be powder coated.

I have had much more tongue weight than that in the past, and it has never been a problem.

Joe
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I wouldn't have a problem carrying fuel and a battery together but that cooler is an inefficient design for that. Get a metal or plastic lockable box you can bolt in place.
This IS a lockable plastic box :wink2: It is also insulated, so the battery and gas would not "cook" inside of it, with the sun beating down on it. I will drill vent holes to air can pass through as the bike moves.

I really wish Escapade would make a LARGER pod trailer of the same design, perhaps three feet longer, and six to eight inches taller.

Joe
 

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Discussion Starter #10
my Jerry can holds 2 gallons, and rides in the right side Saddle bag, to the rear, out of sight.

it fits snugly, and I have never, ever, smelled any fumes when the saddle bag door is opened. that is where I store my Frogg Toggs and bike covers, makes for nice fluffy stuffing to hold that can tight.
The 2018 has smaller saddle bags. A 2-gallon gas can will not fit into it at all. I could take a five gallon can inside of the trailer, but we get back to storage space, and I am not excited about gasoline inside of a pod with food, clothing, tools, etc.. I tend to pack heavy, and be prepared for anything that may happen.

it has been there for 3 years now, never been opened, and no fumes.
I left two inches of room at the top for expansion in warm weather.
If the gasoline in your can is THREE YEARS OLD, it is time to run it through your lawnmower and put some fresh gas into that can!

for you? I would recommend two 2 gallon cans.
two riders who went to Alaska have reported on here, that 2 gallons is not enough, they ran out before the next fuel stop. which involved someone else going after fuel.
I HAVE noticed that my 2018 does not get the range that I got with my 2012. Especially while pulling this trailer, I am expecting a tank range of only 120 - 140 miles at most. I have not done any distances while riding in the "ECONOMY MODE" to check for increased MPG.

A larger (wider and deeper and taller ?) cooler on the tongue would allow me to fit two 2-gallon cans inside. I just didn't want the cooler to be wider than the trailer pod.

IDEALLY, in a perfect world, I would design a fiberglass tongue pod that follows the original body lines of the nose of the Escapade, and it would nest perfectly in front of the original pod, and be painted to match! For the light weight but bulky items (rain suit, motorcycle cover, etc.) I am working on a rooftop container that will separate those items from the things I would access on a more regular basis. It will require stronger gas lifts for the lid as well.

Joe

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build a new trailer yourself.... but it seems that time is a limitation for you.


My wood box trailer measure 32x32x16 inside dimensions.
I use a loose wood panel as a divider between the spare parts, spare battery, in the rear, and my duffle and clothes in the front. It balances out well that way.


Being a square box, camping chairs stack on top very well. It has permanent elastic "tie downs" on top to hold the chairs.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
1st off, those gas containers you have are not Vapor Proof.
I bought a 2 gallon Plastic Jerry Can that has a single Cap that tightens, and is Vapor Proof.... it does NOT have that ugly, useless spout on it.
The new ugly spout is meant to tip the can, insert the nozzle into the (lawnmower/motorcycle/boat tank/etc.) and then press down on a lever to allow air in while gas flows out. I do not like the fact that they sell it WITHOUT a good standard cap, so you can REMOVE the spout for transport.

I carry a Poly Ice Chest on my trailer's front platform.
( for me, it is used for ice/water mix for my Phase Change cooling vest)
That is what this box is, a poly ice chest.

I would place the battery on the "shelf" or "rack" in front of the trailer, and use a standard Battery Hold down clamp available from auto stores to keep it in place. at the base of the battery should be a ridge/Angle Iron/Wood Strip that will prevent the battery from shifting horizontally. The Battery Hold down had two bolts on it, big long J-Bolts go down past the battery and thru the bottom of the shelf/bracket. Just like in your car.
The current setup is a CNC cut stainless steel tray that the battery box is bolted to, through the bottom. It is quite secure, and the cables and mount hardware are concealed.




Battery Boxes, if they fit tight enough, will provide additional protection from flying granite knives kicked up by the bike's tires. IF, there is any room at all for things to shift, it will, that is a given because of the severe terrain you will be traveling over.
The bumps and shudders of the trailer riding over rubble do not really translate to the tongue so much. That is why I would prefer to put the battery and gasoline there.


I would also get a Solar Panel and Charge Regulator to keep those batteries topped off
The trailer battery will be charged off of the bike while it is running. I will look at a solar panel option for longer stays at camp sites.

I REALLY wish Honda would make a 200 watt propane powered super quiet generator the size of a grapefruit! :ROFL:

Speaking of tires. I would highly suggest you put a RF ZP tire on the back.
I am a Darkside Rider already :wink2:

Joe
 

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Discussion Starter #13
build a new trailer yourself.... but it seems that time is a limitation for you.

My wood box trailer measure 32x32x16 inside dimensions.
Oh, man! If I built my own trailer, it would blow the motorcycle camping world away! I would do just that, but I am out of time. :crying2: I will say it would be a LOT bigger than 32x32x16

Joe
 

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This IS a lockable plastic box :wink2: It is also insulated, so the battery and gas would not "cook" inside of it, with the sun beating down on it. I will drill vent holes to air can pass through as the bike moves.


Joe
I can see it's a lockable plastic box but unless you put ice in it it's still going to get hot inside & the insulation takes up space, that was my point.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I purchased the smallest Wal-Mart stainless steel insulated container. It is built exactly like the larger ones, except that it only cost $10.00, instead of $40.00.

Well am I GLAD I only bought the small one to test it. I figured that the cap and seal on the smallest bottle would be made out of the same material as the larger units.

I poured about a quart of premium gasoline into it and sealed it. I laid it on it's side in the sun, just to see how the seal would react to the gasoline.

The GOOD news is, the O-Ring was in perfect condition. The gasoline didn't have any effect on it whatsoever.

The BAD news is, I found only the O-Ring lying on the ground below the bottle opening. The gasoline had completely consumed the cap, and dissolved in into a small puddle of black goo.

So at least I know that this will NOT work for gasoline.

would anyone be interested in a $10.00 O-Ring? :ROFL:

Joe

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Have you checked gas station availability on your route. Hell you can ride to Prudhoe Bay without an issue.
 

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Have you checked gas station availability on your route. Hell you can ride to Prudhoe Bay without an issue.
It is not practical, and maybe not even possible to plan for all gas stops along a 7,000 mile route for a bike that gets a nail biting 120 Miles per Tank of fuel while towing a trailer.

Once I cross into Canada, I am not at the mercy of the distance between gas stations. I am at the mercy of the distance between gas stations that are OPEN, and HAVE fuel, and can DISPENSE fuel.

The same goes for the roads in Alaska. A gas STATION up the road does not guarantee GASOLINE up the road. It is great to know that the next station is "only 90 miles up the road", but what happens when I get there, and it is closed, or out of fuel, or there is no power for their pumps, or it burned down and someone forgot to send me the MILEPOST update insert flyer?

Having never ridden through Canada from The U.S. border to Prudhoe, Alaska, nor across the country from coast to coast, west to east, I have absolutely no idea what I will encounter in the 7,000 miles + distance, but I do know I am not going to rely on the smaller gas tank of the new Goldwing! The North is hilly country. I am TOLD that sections of the road are less than perfectly paved, so dodging construction, slowing for gravel, and other obstacles will also eat away at the tank range. I believe Canada and Alaska not the places to set new high MPG records.

Honda had their heads deeply wedged up their rectums when they did that. A Goldwing should have a 300 MILE range or better, not "140 miles on a good day with a tailwind, and less if you are towing a trailer."

Joe
 
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