Steve Saunders Goldwing Forums banner

21 - 40 of 44 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,865 Posts
I understand your concerns. If its in your comfort zone, pack the gas. Actually you burn less gas in the mountains or on gravel than blasting slab in the flats with a tail wind. On my previous trips, I would be gassing up at 1/2 or 3/4 of a tank just cause it was there.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
58,425 Posts
I understand your concerns. If its in your comfort zone, pack the gas. Actually you burn less gas in the mountains or on gravel than blasting slab in the flats with a tail wind. On my previous trips, I would be gassing up at 1/2 or 3/4 of a tank just cause it was there.

I well remember a trip going home from Corpus Christi to Phx, AZ.
Somewhere just north of San Antonio, Texas..... just a small place :wink2:


the '98SE showed something like half a tank of gas..... and I passed the gas station in front of me...

ah, not to worry, will just stop at the next one...



well, the odometer trip meter was north of 215 miles since last gas stop when I finally saw a small shack by the road..... 1 gas pump, and 20 candy bars for sale.


The yellow light "Fuel Low" had been staring me in the face for what seemed like 10 years.... I remember slowing down to 40 mph for the rest of that segment.... to stretch out what little gas was left in the tank.


That did it for me, I now carry 2 gallons in the right saddle bag at all times, even around here at home.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,865 Posts
I well remember a trip going home from Corpus Christi to Phx, AZ.
Somewhere just north of San Antonio, Texas..... just a small place :wink2:


the '98SE showed something like half a tank of gas..... and I passed the gas station in front of me...

ah, not to worry, will just stop at the next one...



well, the odometer trip meter was north of 215 miles since last gas stop when I finally saw a small shack by the road..... 1 gas pump, and 20 candy bars for sale.


The yellow light "Fuel Low" had been staring me in the face for what seemed like 10 years.... I remember slowing down to 40 mph for the rest of that segment.... to stretch out what little gas was left in the tank.


That did it for me, I now carry 2 gallons in the right saddle bag at all times, even around here at home.

On my sweet ol 82, remove the glove box and you had all kinds of extra storage inside that faring. I carried a 3ft - 3/16 diameter rubber hose, empty water bottle, along with all kinds a wiring, connectors, ignition harness, spark pugs, tape, etc. On more than one occasion that hose and water bottle got pulled out, siphoned out of my tank to help someone on the side of the road. Though I never had to use it on myself, but it was there if needed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
67 Posts
Discussion Starter #25
It occurs to me that small BOATS with outboard motors use gasoline and the gas is generally kept in a metal can next to the battery. The gas cans for boats have a flat bottom, and are shaped like a fat loaf of bread. They are also sealed. So as I head for California, and get with a good friend who has the same CNC plasma table I have, we will design a roof rack for the trailer that will securely nestle a small boat gas tank over the cargo pod, and keep it away from the battery, the exhaust and other hazards.

It would be cool if someone could find a substance that they can pour into gasoline,t hat would float to the top, sort of like oil on water. Then gasoline in a can would have that vapor barrier on top of the fuel, and the gas could be drained out of the bottom of the tank. It would eliminate the risk of an explosion, because the gas would never be able to achieve a vapor state, which is what ignites. This is why you can throw a lit match into a can of diesel fuel. Diesel does not emit volatile fumes that can be ignited. It takes a LOT more heat to ignite diesel.

Frankly, if they ever come out with a turbo diesel Goldwing, I will be one of their first customers!

Joe

.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
58,425 Posts
There is one such diesel smoking beast running around.
it has been around the world more than once.
I saw it at one of our rallys, got pictures of it somewhere.
 

·
Average Goldwing Rider
Joined
·
1,043 Posts
It occurs to me that small BOATS with outboard motors use gasoline and the gas is generally kept in a metal can next to the battery. The gas cans for boats have a flat bottom, and are shaped like a fat loaf of bread. They are also sealed. So as I head for California, and get with a good friend who has the same CNC plasma table I have, we will design a roof rack for the trailer that will securely nestle a small boat gas tank over the cargo pod, and keep it away from the battery, the exhaust and other hazards.

It would be cool if someone could find a substance that they can pour into gasoline,t hat would float to the top, sort of like oil on water. Then gasoline in a can would have that vapor barrier on top of the fuel, and the gas could be drained out of the bottom of the tank. It would eliminate the risk of an explosion, because the gas would never be able to achieve a vapor state, which is what ignites. This is why you can throw a lit match into a can of diesel fuel. Diesel does not emit volatile fumes that can be ignited. It takes a LOT more heat to ignite diesel.

Frankly, if they ever come out with a turbo diesel Goldwing, I will be one of their first customers!

Joe

.
To make an explosion, the oxygen gasoline vapor mixture band is quite narrow. The danger is fire, should the bike be overturned and the fuel spill. I suggest UL approved gas cans and find a way to keep them outside of a closed container. Don't fill them more than 90% and check them whenever you stop.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
130 Posts
Instead of a heavy deep cycle battery, why not a good high cApacity lithium ion battery...or 2 if needed. Those will be considerably lighter while providing ample power. As for a solar panel to keep them charged, I use a solar battery maintainer panel from Harbor Freight or Northern Tools ...(about $20 each on sale) to keep my dozers 1100 amp battery charged when it’s parked in the field away from electricity. I leave it connected all winter long and it has never overcharged the battery.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,497 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
67 Posts
Discussion Starter #30
There is a separate connector from the bike's battery to the tongue battery. The bike will top off the AUX battery while I am riding.

Wouldn't it be nice if HONDA or some aftermarket genius came out with a high quality AUX fuel tank that would be blow molded to fit snugly and precisely inside of the rear trunk? You could raise up the lid, slip this bad boy into the rear trunk, and have maybe ... four gallons? of extra fuel. A quick connect FACTORY fuel line connection could be added to act as a filler-on-the-go. So when your gas gauge reads empty, you push another button :ROFL: to open an electronic valve. The fuel would simply trickle down to your main tank via gravity, and would automatically shut off the fuel flow when the existing fuel level sensor reached say ... 95%, to allow for slow reading of the fuel level sensor. A flow meter could tell you the approximate quantity of fuel remaining in the AUX tank, along with a calculation of range.

AUX Fuel Tank Remaning: 1.4 Gallons - AUX Range 62 miles

Hell, if you didn't want to give up the ridiculously small rear trunk space on the new Wings, even an external tank shaped to compliment the bike's body lines, in bright fire engine red, that securely fastens to the rear trunk rack could carry two or three gallons easily. For an IBA ride, you could use BOTH, and probably have a range of 400 miles or more.

Am I asking for the world here? :nerd:

Joe

.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
67 Posts
Discussion Starter #31
Instead of a heavy deep cycle battery, why not a good high cApacity lithium ion battery...or 2 if needed. Those will be considerably lighter while providing ample power. As for a solar panel to keep them charged, I use a solar battery maintainer panel from Harbor Freight or Northern Tools ...(about $20 each on sale) to keep my dozers 1100 amp battery charged when it’s parked in the field away from electricity. I leave it connected all winter long and it has never overcharged the battery.
I have seen some smaller Lithium-ION batteries, but never one large enough to give any real power reserve to a heavy load. They are usually for recharging cell phones and such, but with this deep cycle marine battery, I could set up campsite lights, run a computer or two for many, many hours, run a CPAP machine all night long (I haven't yielded to that admission of old age quite yet) and even jump start my own bike or another bike, ... or that old Beetle stranded on the side of the long lonely country road driven a beautiful young nymph with a cute pouty face and body that could cause the Pope to kick in a stained glass window, sitting in the driver's seat in barely enough clothing to be legal in public because of the hot night air ... :nerd:

Hey, it COULD happen!

I travel alone, but I take TWO helmets. Boy Scout Motto: Be Prepared!

Joe

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
119 Posts
+1 on the LiPo batteries. WAY smaller and lighter. Really robust too. You could put two LiPo batteries in a fire bag for less than the cost of a decent deep cycle. Two 7.4 volt LiPos in series will start my truck no problem. 5.2 amp hour, 14.8v nominal, about $45.

Why not get like a proper tongue box from Harbor Freight? They're cheap, light, and designed for this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
67 Posts
Discussion Starter #33
+1 on the LiPo batteries. WAY smaller and lighter. Really robust too. You could put two LiPo batteries in a fire bag for less than the cost of a decent deep cycle. Two 7.4 volt LiPos in series will start my truck no problem. 5.2 amp hour, 14.8v nominal, about $45.

Why not get like a proper tongue box from Harbor Freight? They're cheap, light, and designed for this.
Because the box alone is 46 pounds.

Joe

Tongue Box
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
67 Posts
Discussion Starter #34
+1 on the LiPo batteries. WAY smaller and lighter. Really robust too. You could put two LiPo batteries in a fire bag for less than the cost of a decent deep cycle. Two 7.4 volt LiPos in series will start my truck no problem. 5.2 amp hour, 14.8v nominal, about $45.

Why not get like a proper tongue box from Harbor Freight? They're cheap, light, and designed for this.
When you say two 7.4 batteries will START your truck "no problem", are you saying they will start your truck ALONE, or are you just using them to give your regular battery a quick boost? Because those two small batteries would have to produce some 400 cold cranking amps of power during the time you are cranking your engine.

Joe
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
540 Posts
Hell, if you didn't want to give up the ridiculously small rear trunk space on the new Wings, even an external tank shaped to compliment the bike's body lines, in bright fire engine red, that securely fastens to the rear trunk rack could carry two or three gallons easily. For an IBA ride, you could use BOTH, and probably have a range of 400 miles or more.
I saw one aux tank that sits in the passenger seat, it held close to 5 gallons.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
633 Posts
My "Camping" battery is a 110 Amp-Hour Deep Cycle. Heavy as hell but lots of juice!

Besides pulling our Trav-Lite Camper with the bike it is often hitched to the back of the Jeep. We enjoy rock-hopping thru the 4X4 Forest Access roads in the Colorado high country and camping in the forest. There's plenty of roads not so "gnarly" we can't get the camper down them. When we do that, the camper is loaded very light - just blankets, foldy chairs and light stuff that doesn't care about getting bounced around, and most of the gear (Battery, too) is in the Jeep.

One of our favorite spots is at almost 10,000 ft Altitude, and it can get downright COLD (below freezing) at night. Been more than one night we hotted up an electric blanket on the AC inverter.

180 Watt 120v electric blanket = roughly 2 amps 120v AC, or 20 Amps 12v DC, add another 5 amps for inverter inefficiencies. Of course, the blanket isn't on constant, it cycles on and off. With a 110 Amp-Hr battery that's over 4 hrs of blanket "On" time. The battery also powers some strings of lights around the edge of the pop-up canopy and lighting above the cookstove and propane grill, the JVC Boom Box (Gotta have our tunes) and a laptop computer - We might watch a movie or two. If we don't use the blanket the battery will last a 4 day weekend on one charge, otherwise recharge it from the Jeep in the morning.

Try doing THAT with a Lithium Ion pack.

We don't usually need the battery when Bike camping, we're usually in a campground with power. But if there's room in the trailer I bring it anyway.

I want to make a box on the trailer tongue for the battery, but the BBQ sits there bungy-corded to the spare tire. Don't want that messy thing inside the camper. Will have to look at moving the spare tire and grill forward to do that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
67 Posts
Discussion Starter #37
I want to make a box on the trailer tongue for the battery, but the BBQ sits there bungy-corded to the spare tire. Don't want that messy thing inside the camper. Will have to look at moving the spare tire and grill forward to do that.
Or have a talented welder extend the tongue! Tongue weight is ONLY an issue when it is close to the ball hitch. Three feet back, it is less of an issue.

Joe

.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
67 Posts
Discussion Starter #38
I saw one aux tank that sits in the passenger seat, it held close to 5 gallons.
Hey! Now There's an idea! A life-size hollow plastic fuel tank in the shape of a heart-stopping 22-year old well endowed female!! Take the helmet off and open the filler cap at the top of the head. Left leg feeds the engine, right leg is the reserve tank! Get snap-on biker chick clothing, some chaps to keep her cool, and a cool pair of sunglasses, and IBA, here we come! :ROFL:

Joe

.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
25,001 Posts
Wouldn't it be nice if HONDA or some aftermarket genius came out with a high quality AUX fuel tank that would be blow molded to fit snugly and precisely inside of the rear trunk? You could raise up the lid, slip this bad boy into the rear trunk, and have maybe ... four gallons? of extra fuel.

.
Except it would exceed the trunk carrying capacity. But unless you are stick people you already exceed the bike's capacity anyway.
 
21 - 40 of 44 Posts
Top